Carmen Lundy

 

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Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with American Jazz Singer, Composer, Arranger,
Songwriter, Actress, & Painter, Carmen Lundy
Late Fall (October 15, 2014 – November 15, 2014) Edition
Miles High Productions Music Series

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Carmen Lundy
Photo Provided by Carmen Lundy

It is with great pleasure that our online publication presents our newest Miles High Productions’ Music Interview Spotlight Series with American Jazz Singer, Composer, Arranger, Songwriter, Actress, and Painter, Carmen Lundy. This multi-talented entertainer has performing for over three decades, and she is giving music lovers around the world the best in Jazz Music. We had a delightful conversation with the entertainer discussing Lundy’s music, her passion for Jazz, and her many inspirations. Here is what transpired from this wonderful online encounter.

 

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Carmen: Lush, elegant, powerful, honest, and original.

Isaac: Can you elaborate on where did your love and passion for music come from?

Carmen: Don’t know exactly, but probably from family life. My mother was a lead soloist in a group called The Apostolic Singers in Miami when I was growing up, so being around that certainly sparked an interest and joy in music. I always loved listening to different singers too.

Isaac: And can you explain how did that influence your style as a musician?

Carmen: The music of the Black experience is a constant. It has defined a culture, certainly mine.

Isaac: Isaac: As a musician, has your first love always been Jazz Music? What other music do you like to listen to?

Carmen: I discovered jazz along the way, somehow I knew this was the ultimate sound of my life. Even though I played piano and sang in High School, and even cut a single in a studio there (!), I actually started out as an opera major at the University of Miami. When I realized that the people upstairs were playing this other music called Jazz, I switched majors and sprinted full force on this path. Today, I listen to and enjoy anything of substance.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Carmen: There are too many in the collection to choose just one.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you would consider to be the most underrated jazz composer that we should be listening to.

Carmen: That would be me, Carmen Lundy!

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Carmen: I am inspired by the stories people tell. My favorite part is the adventure in discovery of the unknown. And putting that to paper is the real work, the real joy.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Carmen: I love to paint and create works of art. I work with found objects and mixed media as well as paint. It’s my quiet form of expression.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Carmen: My piano, my friends, my family, my canvas, my partner. Not necessarily in that order!

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Carmen: I do not have an answer to this question. Trouble doesn’t seem to find me when I’m performing or on the road, I’m happy to say.

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Carmen: Of course!

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Carmen: I would simply write songs for other people to perform. It’s my life blood.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Carmen: To thine own self be true.

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Carmen: An older Carmen Lundy!!

Isaac: Brilliant!!

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Carmen: Walking into a crowded, packed room in London (or anywhere) filled with people anxiously waiting to hear and experience the music.

Carmen Lundy’s Official Website:
http://www.carmenlundy.com/

Carmen Lundy’s Official Facebook Music Page:
https://www.facebook.com/carmenlundymusic

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Graham King

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Junior’s Cave Interview Exclusive
(Celebrity Interview with
Rising Actor/Model, Graham King)
October/November 2014 Edition

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Graham King
Photo Credit: Larry Hamilton

Recently, we had the great pleasure to speak via online to Rising Actor/Model, Graham King, about his growing career in the entertainment industry. King, who is also big on fitness and health, spoke to our online publication on how he got his start performing on stage and screen as well as his vision for where he wants to take his acting career at in this spotlight. King also shared his secret for maintaining and living a healthy lifestyle why being fit and staying in shape are important to him and his career. Get ready to learn about an amazing new entertainer that is sure to peek your interest in this super stellar spotlight. Enjoy!

Isaac: Graham, we want to welcome you to Junior’s Cave. What has been the standout moment so far in 2014 with your acting career that you would like to let us know about?

Graham: I would say working on my first lead role in a theater production, Venus in Fur. I really worked hard to take the challenge on and it’s pushed me. I also played a really comedic /film noir type detective in Harvey The Great with Films Royale and Director Jesse Barack which was just such a creative and fun cast to work with. We shot at some really cool mansion locations and the costumes and characters were very cool. And it was one of the most motivating experiences. I plan on working with them more and know they will definitely be producing more and more great stuff.

Isaac: What have been your fondest memories growing up in your hometown? What makes it special?

Graham: Cambridge, MA and the Boston area has been an incredible place for me to grow up in and has allowed me to be exposed to history, art, and cultures from around the world. There is definitely a lot of diversity and different people from all over the world so I feel like you begin to understand the different perspectives of people and interaction. Also, the great thing about Boston is people aren’t afraid to tell you how they feel here. I like being near the ocean and just the old rustic look and feel of New England.

Isaac: Fitness is obviously important to you. You have an amazing great shape. What are your main reasons for staying in shape and being healthy? Do you believe it adds to your skill set as an actor?

Graham: I started playing ice hockey and lacrosse, then got into lifting weights in HS. It’s pretty ingrained in me at this point. You just feel better and keeps you motivated and energized. As an actor, you are you’re an asset that has to stay at ready to go. Your body, mind and energy is your livelihood so it seem common sense to me that you would take care of yourself.

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Graham King
Photo Credit: Larry Hamilton

Isaac: At what age did you decide that you wanted to become an actor?

Graham: I started fairly recently in January at 25 after I started auditioning in local Boston student films. I was very pleased with the experiences working on set and knew it was something I had to do. As a kid, I thought about maybe trying directing or something in the production or marketing area of the business but for some reason acting didn’t specifically occur to me. I quickly started booking larger projects and more of variety and have been learning every step of the way trying to find my groove. Then I joined New England Actor’s Workshop with coach/teacher Richard C. Bailey, based in Boston, and it is has been really pivotal in terms of getting serious about my training and the commitment that acting requires.

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Graham King
Photo Credit: Larry Hamilton

Isaac: Why do you believe you pursue acting with such deep passion? What is it about acting that fulfills you the most?

Graham: Ever since I was kid I always liked stories and storytelling, I grew up really being inspired by films but also by the people that made them. There’s a lot of power in the ability to do that. I remember watching my uncle in TV and stage and always respected the work he did and what it took. My sister started at a younger age in high school with theater and saw hours she put it and rehearsals. Knew it was hard work and that it was important.

Isaac: What do you feel has been your biggest acting achievement professionally for your career so far and why?

Graham: It would have to definitely be taking on the role of Thomas in Venus in Fur on stage at The Arts and Motion Theater with Director Tatiana Zharahova. Without a doubt, it’s the adrenaline and the feeling of having gone through it and realizing I am going to continue to do the work to make sure I work on stage feels great. I never thought I would be doing it before and I only aspired to work on films but I am happy I opened up to giving it a go.

Isaac: Have you ever taken a role that you were not passionate about but needed the work?

Graham: Sure not everything is the same but I really try to take on every role with a lot of optimism and put hard work into it regardless because I believe that work ethic and attitude is really important to making the difference on a set. It’s all attitude! There can be a lot of waiting around, boredom, mishaps and you have to be someone who reminds everyone there why they work on these projects, because of passion.

Isaac: Have you ever worked on a project and once you saw the finished product was unhappy with either the project or your performance in the project?

Graham: Sure, I think it’s always hard to not scrutinize yourself. Especially when you’re watching yourself on screen. Although at the end of the day, it’s in the hands of the editor so I try to just remember that and give everything I can to each take so they have the best chance to highlight you and really transfer the right energy through.

 photo GKBTS_zpsd0f0a1fa.jpg Graham King/AD Men Courtesy of Jesse Barack, Films Royale

Isaac: When you are looking for a part; what are some of the important attributes that you look for in one of the characters you are going to portray?

Graham: I get cast for and generally like to go after characters who are in many ways your typical guys that you find in society, grounded but are put in extreme or interesting circumstances. The leading man type roles. I also at the same time often like playing unsuspected villains or characters with a hidden agendas as well. They can bring out a lot of suspense, uncertainty and tension.

Isaac: Do you feel that you can tackle more controversial roles? Are you afraid to portray a character that may not be liked by the general viewing public?

Graham: I think it makes it very engaging for audiences to be confronted with someone that they can’t accept or is opposition to their believes, I think that it would be a mistake to shy away from these roles as they can be the most interesting.

Isaac: If you had an opportunity to work with one director in a film, who would it be and why would you want to work with this director?

Graham: I think working with Ridley Scott would be incredible, because the types of fantasy and sci-fi stories and worlds he’s created always have blown me away and I think it would be a privilege to work with someone like that who is so creative. In generally, however, I would say directors who are or have been actors would be who I gravitate to. Someone like Ed Harris who is one of my favorite actors who knows the process of acting would be unreal to work with on a set. Whoa, if only any that could happen!

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Isaac: With some many comic book movies being made, have you ever wanted to portray a comic book character and if so who would you want to portray in film and why?

Graham: I always like someone like Batman or the Punisher with some grit. I recently got cast to play the role of Prince Charming who is really kind of a stock character, not quite what I would call gritty, but hey I am ready to give it a go.

Isaac: At the end of the day, what do you want others to take away from your acting performances?

Graham: I think like most actor’s I want the audience to feel something, a mood and energy shift. It’s what I love about acting.

Isaac: You also work as a model. Is modeling something that you want to pursue on a professional level?

Graham: Currently I have been, I would like to work in the lifestyle/commercial area more. It’s really just fun and always a creative upbeat experience. Although I am not a photographer, I have always loved great photos and have a real appreciation. It connects me with that world for sure.

Isaac: What has been your favorite modeling gig and why?

Graham: The cover for “Into the Maelstrom” (David Drake and John Lambshead) I modeled for with photographer/illustrator Dave Seeley. I’ve done about 6 covers and I liked working on this one because not only is the finished product always incredible and impressive it’s just such an interesting and creative process shooting with Dave. He uses props and costumes to really get you into a character that comes across great in the photography. It’s anything but a typical photo shoot.

Isaac: What has been your favorite place to travel for your modeling gig?

Graham: I haven’t traveled too far for that type of work yet but I would say NYC was a pretty cool place to shoot. Different feel, with a lot creative people.

Isaac: Elaborate on some of your current projects that you are working on that you can let our readers know about.

Graham: Right now I am just wrapping up a Venus and Fur, a stage production that has really pushed me as an actor and taught be a lot. It’s like a mental gymnastics session but I love it. In October, I am going to be working on horror feature film, Tobacco Jack, with Moongoyle Entertainment and a short with Director Mac Capen called Johari’s Window where I play the character of Prince Charming. New stuff is always on the horizon so I will keep you posted for sure.

Isaac: Complete this sentence for us:

Graham: “2015 will be the year that Graham King will be working, working, and working!”

Graham King’s Official Website:
http://neactor.com/profile/GrahamKing

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Marshelle Fair

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Junior’s Cave Interview Exclusive
(Celebrity Interview with
Rising Actress, Marshelle Fair)
October/November 2014 Edition

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Marshelle Fair
Photo Credit: Levi Walker Photography 2011

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA

It was her strong performance as the likeable yet complicated fun character S.J. on the Indie Television Series DTLA that caught our attention, originally. However, it was learning more about this wonderfully gifted, young, and talented Actress that gave us the courage to ask Actress Marshelle Fair for an interview with our small indie online magazine. Upon conducting our research on Fair’s background and career, we discovered she has also worked behind the scenes including working as a Stage Manager for several of James Franco’s plays at PlayHouse. We also discovered some other cool and fun facts about this down to earth, funny, and witty actress that makes this interview one of our coolest interviews to date. Here is what formulated from our magical online encounter with Marshelle Fair in this super ultra-fantastic spotlight.

Isaac: Marshelle, we want to welcome you to Junior’s Cave. We had an opportunity to review your online bio. We also reviewed some of your projects including DTLA. Can you elaborate a little about your upbringing in St. Louis, Missouri before we get into your acting skills?

Marshelle: Well, we moved around quite a bit actually when I was young, my father was a bit of a nomad. I grew up in Oklahoma, Texas, and Missouri, but mainly Oklahoma and Missouri. I had a very Huck Finn childhood, playing in creeks, climbing trees, riding horses. I was always out in the woods or sitting under a tree reading, writing stories, or sketching. My parents divorced when I was a teenager and my mom moved us back to Missouri to be with her family. I went to college in St. Louis. I was a science major in college, switched to English Lit, then with one more semester to go I think it was, I left the University to get into broadcasting. I was in radio for a while, then got into producing and field reporting for a couple local shows. I also acted in theatre both local and professional, would be in films whenever they came through town.

Isaac: You are also a Costume Designer. What do you enjoy the most about this profession?

Marshelle: Oh, I’m not really a Costume Designer per se. I was a stage manager for several of James Franco’s plays at PlayHouse, and he made a couple of them into shorts. I just helped come up with the outfits. It was simple and fun. I do love that aspect of putting everything together. You find so much out about character. A certain style of hat can make you feel completely different. Does he wear a tie or is he a little more free? Unbutton a couple buttons, etc.

Isaac: This is very interesting, and it says a lot about the profession that I didn’t fully understood.

Isaac: What drew you into wanting to pursue a career in this profession?

Marshelle: It was something I always wanted to do, ever since I was a little girl. I was always in school plays or making movies with my brother and our friends. Actually, I think it really hit me when I was six and I played an angel around the manger in the Christmas pageant. I wore black patent shoes and when I saw the photograph of me on stage, it looked like I was floating. Complete magic to me. It wasn’t practical where I grew up to pursue acting as a profession, so I ended up working behind the scenes. Eventually, I was literally pushed in front of the camera and I realized it was something I could do. I just love to act and create. It’s not about being “a movie star” – I just want to work.

Isaac: Where do you draw your inspirations for your designs when you are working?

Marshelle: I’ll apply this question to writing. Anything can inspire me, I still have a bit of a childlike wonder with the world.

Isaac: Why do you believe you pursue acting with such deep passion? What is it about acting that fulfills you the most?

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Marshelle Fair
Photo Courtesy of

https://www.facebook.com/therealmarshellefair

Marshelle: This may sound completely ridiculous, but to me there’s nothing like it. When you are truly in the moment and you’ve done your research, as my acting coach says, the scene just sort of plays you. That’s amazing to me. For me, I feel completely free. I love working off someone and completely buying into the circumstances, whether you feel like your heart has been ripped out or whatever the scene involves, and then you hear “cut” – there’s always a pause and then such a release of emotion, usually laughter on my end regardless of how upset I was the previous moment. …I think I just like to mess with myself, see how far I can go etc.

What fulfills me the most? I don’t know actually. I don’t think I can answer that. I love researching a character, I love riding the wave and going wherever your emotions and the imaginary circumstances take you. Living in that moment I suppose.

Isaac: You are building up quite an impressive resume especially with your background in both films, shorts, and modeling. Let’s discuss your role in DTLA. What drew you to want to portray this character?

Marshelle: I wanted to work. I’m kidding. No, I’m not… I am. I’m kidding…

I love SJ. She scared me, so I had to do it. I love how she’s so unpredictable. She’s also haunted and that always gets me excited. Flawed characters are so much more interesting to me. I love her spirit and her struggle to try to overcome, herself, perhaps?

I was able to collaborate on SJ, which was incredibly rewarding.

Isaac: Sounds like a win-win situation there!

Isaac: What did you love about working with such a young and talented cast of actors?

Marshelle: What’s not to love? Amazing group of people, in complete honesty. We truly felt like a family.

Isaac: Your character is pretty complicated. Did you enjoy playing such a character full of huge complicated emotions? What has been your favorite scene to play in the series and why?

Marshelle: As I said before, the more messed up the better! I’m crazy like that I guess, but the more complicated a character is, the more layers it creates. I like to add the details, be really specific about it all. The more complicated, the more afraid I am that I can’t do it. I love the challenge of that.

I don’t have a favorite scene really. I loved fighting with Billy (William McNamara), scenes between SJ and Kevin were always great. SJ and Kai. Any scene with Julie Goldman (the bouncer) was hysterical. We did so many different versions of that fight outside the bar. We just went for it, but we were laughing so much it had to be difficult I’m sure to find takes to piece together.

Isaac: What are some of the different feedback you can share with us about your performance in the series?

Marshelle: Oh I’m not going to toot my own horn, thank you for asking the question though. I did get killer feedback, so that was nice, but I don’t want to say specifically what was said.

Isaac: Fair enough!!!

Isaac: What do you feel has been your biggest achievement professionally for your career so far and why?

Marshelle: I don’t think I’ve reached my biggest achievement professionally just yet. I’m looking forward to seeing what that is myself. But in my mind, we always grow.

Isaac: Have you ever taken a role that you were not passionate about but needed the work?

Marshelle: Yep.

Isaac: :-)

Isaac: Have you ever worked on a project and once you saw the finished product was unhappy with either the project or your performance in the project?

Marshelle: Yep.

It’s usually when you see the takes they’ve chosen for whatever reason, when you KNOW you did others that were probably way better. It’s hard to see that. Or, you trust that they’ll show this or that, aaaaaand they don’t. Or they show five minutes of a love scene that was only supposed to be three seconds, etc., etc. Don’t get me started…

Isaac: :-)

Isaac: When you are looking for a part; what are some of the important attributes that you look for in one of the characters you are going to portray?

Marshelle: Conflict. Flaws. Honestly, there’s not a checklist, it’s just what hits me at the time, you know? What resonates with me.

Isaac: Do you feel that you can tackle more controversial roles? Are you afraid to portray a character that may not be liked by the general viewing public?

Marshelle: I would love that. Absolutely. I could care less if it’s an unlikeable character. There’s always a lot of grey in mind to “unlikeable” characters. In their mind, they can completely justify their actions. I would love to play an evil character, malicious or whatever. One just can’t view them as these one note cardboard “types,” when playing them. Well I guess someone could, but how boring would that be?

Isaac: If you had an opportunity to work with one director in a film, who would it be and why would you want to work with this director?

Marshelle: Oh man, really? Just one? Well, I love Christopher Nolan. So we’ll say him for right now. Ever since Memento, I think…I don’t know, he’s magic to me.

Isaac: With so many comic book movies being made, have you ever wanted to portray a comic book character and if so who would you want to portray in film and why?

Marshelle: I’m a complete geek, and I admit it. I read comic books growing up. Marvel in particular. Love sci-fi. My brother would play Dungeons and Dragons when I was a kid, so I was always fascinated by that.
Many of my favorites have already been played. Maybe the Scarlet Witch? I loved Jean Grey/ Phoenix, but that’s obviously been done.

Isaac: Obviously, being in this profession is very hard. With the recent tragic death of Robin Williams, what advice do you have others who are feeling overwhelmed by the daily grind of being in this business? How do you handle the pressure yourself?

Marshelle: Vodka is how I handle it. I’m kidding! I…don’t know, it’s hard. I would never say it’s not. You have to develop a thick skin and believe in yourself no matter what anyone says. There are so many people, both in front and behind the camera, that have no clue what they’re doing and unfortunately they are the gatekeepers. They use their positions as a total power trip. I think you have to try and create your own opportunities. Remind yourself of why you love doing this. Stay grounded, don’t get caught up in trying to be the prettiest or the best, just try to be the best you can be. Surround yourself with a good group of people, that’s incredibly important. Create balance in your life, it can’t just be about the work all the time.
Isaac: What do you do to relax and have fun?

Marshelle: I write a lot. I may be a bit boring, I’m coming to terms with this.

I go to hot yoga, I resisted that for so long because it just seemed silly to me, but now I completely love it. It really helps me with stress. I get outdoors as much as I can. I grew up in the woods, so I need trees here and there. Go for a hike, that sort of thing. I want to get a horse one of these days.

Isaac: At the end of the day, what do you want others to take away from your acting performances?

Marshelle: Wow. I don’t know. Maybe a sense of truth? Hopefully they don’t walk away feeling like I “performed” – but that there was a feel of truth in what was happening.

Isaac: Elaborate on some of your current projects that you are working on that you can let our readers know about.

Marshelle: My business partner and I just started a production company actually. We’re, right now, in the early pre-production stage for our first film. Total Indie. Of course. (That’s me making fun of myself by the way) it our way for this film. Riverstar Productions. It’s a character piece, we’re determined to do. We have a couple of other scripts and a pilot we wrote. Several other script ideas down the pike as well. I’m very excited about Riverstar. We’re tired of knocking on doors, time to open a few for ourselves.

Isaac: Brilliant!!!

Isaac: Complete this sentence for us. “2015 will be the year that Marshelle Fair…”

Marshelle: …knocks the door down.”
(she says with a wink and a smile)

Official Facebook Fan Page:
https://www.facebook.com/therealmarshellefair

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Eric Kamen

 

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Junior’s Cave 
Music Interview 
with Musician, Composer, & Producer, Eric Kamen
Photo Provided by Eric Kamen
Early Fall (September 2014) Edition 
Miles High Productions Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Eric Kamen

It is with great pleasure that we introduced to our online readers of this publication the wonderful and talented Musician, Composer and Producer, Eric Kamen. The New York City born-and-bred musician, composer and producer has transformed his long enriching career in the music business to create something refreshing, new, and innovative. It is his blend of several music genres consisting of World Music, Flamenco, Urban Flamenco, & Latin Music that certainly makes him stand out from other musicians. We speak to Kamen about his music and discover some cool fun facts from him. Here is what transpired from our online encounter.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words or less:

Eric: Urban Flamenco!

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Eric: Jimi Hendrix, Paco de Lucia, Babyface (as an R&B producer), Bach, and Vivaldi.

Isaac: What is your primary reason that drew you to World Music, Flamenco, Urban Flamenco, & Latin?

Eric: I adore R&B as well as music from the Middle East, North Africa, Spain et. al. I couldn’t choose one over the other … so I am striving to meld them together.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Eric: I have never taken my Urban Flamenco ‘on the road’. Up to this point, it has been a ‘laboratory experiment’ LOL … the laboratory being my home studio. I feel like a ‘mad scientist’, trying to merge R&B, Hip-Hop and Old World acoustic music. I am seriously considering putting together a band and going on the road with Urban Flamenco. Apart from that, like most musicians, my favorite song to play is – the one I am presently working on! LOL! It’s true – many/most musicians frequently feel that their latest song is the ‘best thing they have ever done’.

Isaac: Which non-musical influences do you consider are important to your music?

Eric: I detest the hatred amongst the various cultures of the World … and anything I can do to bring people together, in my own humble way, is the worth the effort to me! My major countries are presently Indonesia, Mexico, Turkey, Brazil et al. I have lots of fans and friends in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Israel, and Germany. I am VERY proud of this! In my own small way, I am succeeding at breaking the cultural barrier which exists across countries, cultures and religions. If I can reach and out touch some 14 year old kid in Pakistan who is just learning to play the guitar, piano … or whatever, and help them appreciate that we are truly all the same – it was worth the effort! By the way … My own country, the US, is about #12 – obviously mostly from NY, CA and the states bordering Mexico.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Eric: You will be disappointed but Beyoncé is my favorite current artist! I have to watch Single Ladies every night or else I can’t consider my day complete! As a composer/producer, I pay a lot of homage to Kanye and Timbaland. I study them and what they do, as I study Bach or Ottmar Liebert They are geniuses … and most people over 25 or 30 don’t really appreciate it. To add some rationale, what Beyoncé, Kanye and Bach all have in common is that they were/are all trying to ‘break the mold’ and create something new. While I will (duh) obviously never be another Kanye or Bach, I too am most attracted to the notion of creating something new. It requires an immense amount of personal courage, intellect and talent.

Isaac: What does it mean for you to play the guitar? Describe when you first began to have a passion for the guitar?

Eric: You ask really good questions! As a young adolescent, I started to appreciate that the only thing that really made sense to me were the Arts. School seemed dumb and a waste of time. The Beatles and Jimi Hendrix et. al. were what was relevant to me back then. I spent 40 years working in Corporate America and, while I admittedly was quite successful and eventually became a Managing Director at a ‘bulge bracket’ US Securities firm, from the start, none of it really made any sense. The people with whom I worked seemed slow, unimaginative and frankly timid – afraid of change. I would sit through 2-hour meetings and be thinking to myself – ‘what in God’s name are these people talking about?’ The only aspect of Corporate America which had any appeal for me was product invention and innovation. My skill at this is what propelled my corporate career. Trust me – it was not my ability to do the annual budget … or craft a water-tight $100 million contract LOL. In summary, playing the guitar (and piano!) represented reality, groundedness, creativity (and a connection with my parents (both of whom were musicians).

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process.

Eric: I am a very analytical person (and a Virgo). Music, being an art as well as a science does require both sides of the brain, but to compose music, I have to find a way to become less analytical … and more emotional. I have developed a technique which, at least, works for me. I call it ‘speed writing’. I have to put my brain aside, focus only on how I am feeling in the very moment, I lay down 10 or 12 musical ideas … often only 20 or 30 second snippets – in an hour or two, dump them onto a CD … and then don’t listen to any of them for 2 or 3 weeks. After 2 or 3 weeks, I listen to them again, and it is obvious which are boring and derivative and which have a touch or ‘fairy dust’ on them. I chose the ideas which have the fairy dust and then apply my analytical mind to further developing them.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Eric: Gypsy Kings, Ottmar Liebert, Sting, or Enya.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Eric: I am a history buff and a news junkie. Anyone who knows me knows that I tend to rant and rave about current events (especially when I am ‘under the influence’). I have considered starting up a Poly Sci blog …. And I may actually do it at some point. Apart from that, I love cooking (I learned my basic cooking skills in Paris when I lived there at 21 years old) reading (especially non-fiction, mostly science. philosophy and history).

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Eric: 0. My wife, 5 children and 2 grandchildren 1. The World at War (TV series) 2. CNN international (Anderson Cooper, Wolf Blitzer, Chistiane Amanpour, et al) 3. eCigs (I haven’t had a ‘real’ cigarette in 5 years) 4. A really good Malbec or Cabernet Sauvignon with dinner 5. Voice Recognition on my iPhone 5. I have not actually typed (on a keyboard) an email or text for several years! I speak them.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Eric: As I mentioned previously, I don’t presently have a band to play Urban Flamenco. It is all done in the studio. I spent MANY years playing out with Rock bands when I was younger, and needless to say, I have many recollections; mostly sordid and not for public consumption. One of the ‘groupies’ from those years turned out to be my first wife! She came up on stage while we were on a break, while I was tuning my bass, and the obvious happened LOL. We spent 33 years together as a couple and had a sensational child (who is now a grown man with his own child!). The divorce was sooooo expensive that this clearly warrants being referred to as ‘the most trouble I got into’ LOL. The good news is that the love amongst us all remains even though we are both re-married and have gone our own separate ways.

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Eric: My first impulse is to respond – no, not at all … but not in the way you would imagine. When I was younger, I wanted to be a musician, but after a period, I became a Corporate software engineer (i.e. a programmer) and manager, and did not re-join the music community for 15 or 20 year, at which point I became an R&B and Hip-Hop producer (well prior to becoming a Urban Flamenco artist in 2005. Having said that, it is admittedly not so clear. The penchant for creativity which I bring to music is also the same creativity I brought to software engineering … and I have to admit, I loved those years as a programmer … not to mention, I earned a lot of money, traveled around the World multiple times over. So – I think my answer – one cannot and should not try to control one’s life but simply go with the flow … and que sera sera.

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Eric: I think about this question all the time! I think I would like to be some type of ‘Life Coach’ (although I am not officially qualified). Having had 2 wives and 5 children, a corporate and artistic career, I have seen it all! I know more about psychotherapy than I should LOL. I understand the corporate world and the job market like the back of my hand. I think I would have a lot to offer someone who is somewhat ‘lost in life’. I have always had a penchant for being a care-taker.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Eric: Be true to yourself! Don’t live your life based upon what your parents or your peers think or want you to do!

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….(fill in the blank) …

Eric: older and more wrinkled, LOL … but hopefully still as sexy as Mick Jagger!

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Eric: I think gaining 500,000 friends in a few weeks on Myspace (back in 2005) with my first World Music CD (Native Unit) was probably it! Native Unit was my first attempt at creating a merger of R&B and Flamenco. It felt like a big risk … and was instantly a big success with fans. It has remained that way ever since! Native Unit had a much greater impact than any of the R&B singers or rappers I was producing at the time. That experience changed my sense of self … and the trajectory of my artistic career.

Official Website of Eric Kamen
http://erickamen.com/

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Food Wars: Shokugeki no Souma Manga

Entertainment Earth

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Noreé Leggett’s
Food Wars: Shokugeki no Souma Manga: Latest Review
September/October 2014 Edition
Learn more about her
Newest Review Here!
(Access Page Below)
                                                                                                           
@ http://www.juniorscave.com/noreeleggett.html

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Moronai Kanekoa

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Junior’s Cave Interview Exclusive
(Celebrity Interview with
Rising Actor,                                         Moronai Kanekoa)
September/October 2014 Edition

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Moronai Kanekoa

Rising Actor Moronai Kanekoa made the important decision at the age of 23 to pursue his dreams of becoming an actor. Kanekoa has always had a passion for film and television so moving towards entertaining others seemed like the most logical choice. We discover in this new spotlight with the young and talented actor his amazing journey of self-discovery of who he is and what he wants to do with his life. Kanekoa also shares his fondest memories growing up in Maui, his big move from New York City to Los Angeles, and where he believes he fits in with the pool of great actors in Hollywood. Here is his ultra-cool story for your reading pleasure.

Isaac: Moronai, we want to welcome you to Junior’s Cave. What has been the standout moment so far in 2014 with your acting career that you would like to let us know about?

Moronai: The stand out moment of 2014 would probably be when I performed a one-man show called The Legend of Ko’olau at the Hawaii Theater on Oahu this past May. Not only did I have my family in the audience, but some high school friends from Maui came to see it as well. There were even some faces of college friends in the audience that I hadn’t seen for years. For me, it was a special moment to share with them not only for them to see what I had been working on for that show, but also what I’ve been working on in the past 10 years as far as acting training and schooling. For most of them, it was the first time they had seen me on stage.

Isaac: Sounds pretty awesome!!!

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Moronai Kanekoa

Isaac: What have been your fondest memories growing up in Maui? What makes it special?

Moronai: One of my fondest memories growing up on Maui was going to the trash dump with my family and scavenging for anything that was still in good condition. I laugh about it now with my brothers and sisters, but really it’s those kinds of activities with my family that bonded us and kept us close.

Isaac: Fitness is obviously important to you. You have an amazing great shape. What are your main reasons for staying in shape and being healthy? Do you believe it adds to your skill set as an actor?

Moronai: I started exercising and going to the gym when I first went to college and I couldn’t stop. Although at times I have to force myself to go, I always feel better afterwards. As an actor, you have to stay in shape. Your body is your instrument. If your instrument is rusty, you have to polish it. I’ve also found working out to be a great stress reliever. And as an actor, stress is a part of everyday life.

Isaac: At what age did you decide that you wanted to become an actor?

Moronai: I decided to become an actor at 23. I had never done any acting before and I scrapped the idea of going to med school so I said what the hell, let’s go for it. So I did.

Isaac: Why do you believe you pursue acting with such deep passion? What is it about acting that fulfills you the most?

Moronai: Personally, acting is cathartic. It helps me relieve stress and experience things that I normally may not be able to. Also, television and film has always been a way for me to learn and connect to other people around the world. Now, I want to do that for other people.

Isaac: You moved to Los Angeles a few years ago to work on a Masters Acting Program at USC. How pivotal was it for you as an entertainer to move to Los Angeles?

Moronai: It was very important for me. I was living in New York City right before moving to LA and the fast pace and stress of NYC was getting to me. LA was really my only other choice. When I auditioned for grad school, I actually only auditioned for schools in Southern California. And when I got into USC, it was a perfect fit. Apart from being the hub of the film and television industry, LA is also more laid back and closer to home. It all made sense.

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Moronai Kanekoa

Isaac: What do you feel has been your biggest acting achievement professionally for your career so far and why?

Moronai: For me, getting through my MFA Acting program at USC was a huge achievement. That may not necessarily be on a “professional” level, but definitely on a personal level. I always tell people that the 3 years I spent there was a “positive traumatic experience”; one that has definitely changed me and, hopefully, for the better. :-)

Isaac: Have you ever taken a role that you were not passionate about but needed the work?

Moronai: Definitely! Hey, I need money. And at the point where my career is at right now, I’m not in a position to say no to too many things.

Isaac: Have you ever worked on a project and once you saw the finished product was unhappy with either the project or your performance in the project?

Moronai: Yep. Mostly my performance. That’s all I really take responsibility for. If the project didn’t turn out as well as I hoped, it sucks, but I don’t feel like there’s much I could’ve done to change that. On the other hand, if my performance sucks, well then I better do something about that….and quick, so it doesn’t happen again.

Isaac: When you are looking for a part; what are some of the important attributes that you look for in one of the characters you are going to portray?

Moronai: I definitely look for conflict. People who are torn between two things…ideas, other people, beliefs, etc. They’re always the most interesting for me.

Isaac: Do you feel that you can tackle more controversial roles? Are you afraid to portray a character that may not be liked by the general viewing public?

Moronai: I’m actually not sure about that. It’s never come up for me. I think if the controversial role deals with something that I think should be addressed or something that affects me in a personal way, then I feel like I wouldn’t care what anyone else thought…except maybe my family. I’d probably run it past them first.

Isaac: If you had an opportunity to work with one director in a film, who would it be and why would you want to work with this director?
Moronai: I would definitely love to work with J. J. Abrams. I love his films!

Isaac: He is a pure genius in my opinion!

Isaac: With some many comic book movies being made, have you ever wanted to portray a comic book character and if so who would you want to portray in film and why?

Moronai: YES!! I would LOVE to play a comic book character! And I don’t even care which one. Well, of course I’d like to be Superman, but that’s already been done. Or even Green Lantern. Again, already been done. I grew up reading comics and especially collecting comic book cards. There’s probably no other role that I would rather do more than play a comic book hero. That, and play a vampire.

Isaac: Pretty COOL!!!

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Moronai Kanekoa in Steam Room Stories

Isaac: Let’s talk about one of your new acting projects working on the set of: Steam Room Stories. How did you come about getting a part in this popular hit Web Series?

Moronai: I actually first met JC when I auditioned for him for the movie, The 10 Year Plan. After doing that movie, we’ve kept in touch and a few months ago he asked me if I wanted to be a part of Steam Room Stories.

Isaac: What drew you to wanting to be a part of this series?

Moronai: I hadn’t done anything like it before, so I said why not. Plus, I’m a fan of JC. He’s a wonderful and talented man, so when he asked, of course I was going to say yes.

Isaac: What do your family and friends think of your involvement in the web series?

Moronai: I actually don’t know. I never asked them. I don’t even know if they’ve seen any of the episodes yet. I’m sure they’re ok with it though. They’ve always been supportive of me and my decisions.

Isaac: I have been watching the series since the beginning. Where you a fan of the series before joining the cast? Have you seen any of the previous episodes?

Moronai: So actually I hadn’t seen any of them before JC asked me to be a part of them. He wanted me see an episode before I did it, so the first time I saw it, I was actually with him.

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Moronai Kanekoa in Steam Room Stories

Isaac: At the end of the day, what do you want others to take away from your acting performances?

Moronai: Any time I perform, I just hope people in some way relate to my character and enjoy what they’re seeing.

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Moronai Kanekoa (right) in Steam Room Stories

Isaac: Elaborate on some of your current projects that you are working on that you can let our readers know about.

Moronai: I’m still doing that one-man show called The Legend of Ko’olau. It’s based on a true story about a man from Kauai who contracts leprosy and runs away into the mountains with his family to avoid being captured and taken to a leper colony on Molokai. It’s a very heart-breaking story that deals with a lot of universal themes like the importance of family and home and what you’re willing to do to protect that. It’s also a great way to learn more about the history and culture of Hawaii.

Isaac: Complete this sentence for us. “2015 will be the year that Moronai Kanekoa…”

Moronai: 2015 will be the year that Moronai Kanekoa finally learns how to cook. I’ve always been so much better at eating than cooking.

Isaac: :-)

The Official Website of Moronai Kanekoa
http://www.moronaikanekoa.com/

All Photos Courtesy of Moronai Kanekoa

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ShaDo

 
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Junior’s Cave 
Music Interview 
with Rising Hip-Hop Artist, ShaDo
Early Fall (September 2014) Edition 
MusicSUBMIT Weekly Music Series

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA

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ShaDo
Photo Courtesy of ShaDo

Hip-Hop has a new lyrical flow master and his name is ShaDo. The young and gifted poetic is representing the Hip-Hop Industry and showing others how it should be done! If anyone thinks Hip-Hop is dead, then look to ShaDo to help resurrect it from the grave. In this recent spotlight with our publication, we speak to ShaDo about his music, his influences, and what he believes he has to offer to the Hip-Hop Industry. Here is his story for your reading enjoyment.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

ShaDo: Encouraging, fun, soothing, poetic, & soulful.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

ShaDo: My significant musical influence would have to be Childish Gambino, He was always someone I looked up to. He really showed me that you don’t have to be like everyone else to be successful. This really allowed me to dig in to a deeper side if my life and become unique with my work. Looking at Gambino, he was always different with his art whether it was his story lines, or his style. Gambino taught me there are no limits that are set, you are the only person to limit yourself.

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ShaDo
Photo Courtesy of ShaDo

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

ShaDo: At the moment I’ve been listening to a lot of J. Cole, Kendrick Lamar, and Meek Mill. To me, these artists are beyond great. There are plenty of other artists who belong on the radio but I really tie into these three artists. My writing style is a mixture of them. I like to think of myself as poetic with a dark twist such as J. Cole and Kendrick Lamar and aggression and emotion I bring to my art like Meek Mill.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

ShaDo: I draw a lot of my inspiration from my past as a kid. My mom had a very hard life and raising me didn’t make it easier. She was always on the run with three jobs, always on the clock. She was a single mother trying to provide for me. Of course, in the moment, as a kid I didn’t really pay much attention to it, but now it really makes me realize how hard and cold this world can be. She showed me that even though life is tough it’s not an excuse to not be successful. My mother always had determination and ambition in her veins and she inspired me to always raise the bar with each song I created.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

ShaDo: I would definitely open up for Childish Gambino only because I feel like he’s helped me so much with my dream and vision and he has no clue how much of an impact he’s made and inspiration he has given me.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

ShaDo: I really enjoy spending time with my son, my family, and very few close friends I would also consider family. I always hold those moments close to my heart because without these loved ones around me I would be nothing. Every single one of them plays a big part in my life.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

ShaDo: My son, he inspires me to always push myself to be the best so I can provide for his future. My mother, she has been a great idol and one hell of a mother to me. Music, it’s how I deal with my problems, even just listening to music knowing that someone can relate to your struggles is uplifting to know you’re not the only one. My phone, it’s how I communicate with everyone. God, he’s brought me through a lot not to mention giving the gift to write and create music. Without him protecting me and keeping me out of trouble, there’s no telling where I’d be at this point in my life.

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ShaDo
Photo Courtesy of ShaDo

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

ShaDo: I haven’t managed to get myself into trouble. Of course, I still have a great time but I try to stay focused and determined…

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

ShaDo: Most def…but I still have a lot to learn.

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

ShaDo: Something involving the science of the human body, it has always interested me how we are perfectly designed to love and function with almost no effort.

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ShaDo
Photo Courtesy of ShaDo

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

ShaDo: Wish it…Dream it…Do it!

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

ShaDo: Ten years from now I hope to see my music continuously growing. I hope to see me giving my son the life I never had. I hope to see my family happy and proud of me for chasing my dreams. I hope that I can continue to relate to so many people and their stories through my music.

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

ShaDo: One of the best moments while performing is looking out to the audience and seeing everyone’s eyes on you. Watching you, your every move. Seeing their mouths move to the words of your song. Seeing bodies move to the beat. Something about it is very peaceful.

Official Website:
http://www.iamshado.com/

ShaDo – Million

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Steam Room Stories: The Review

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Junior’s Cave Review Exclusive
Steam Room Stories:                           The Review of the Popular Web Series
September/October 2014 Edition

Review by Isaac Davis, Jr., BGS, MBA

Steam Room Stories: The Review of the Popular Web Series

The Internet is a great outlet for talented people working in front and behind the camera to showcase their projects. One project that is fun to watch is the hit Web Series Steam Room Stories. It is a smart, witty, and sometimes pushing-the-envelope-of-hot-topics type of series that features hot guys in a variety of hilarious skits taking place in….well , the steam room. The best part of this show is the ambiguity of the featured guys’ sexuality as they embark on some risqué homoerotic topics that keeps the audiences guessing if the guys are straight, bi, gay, confused, or just plain curious.

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A Scene From The Popular
Web Series: Steam Room Stories
Photo Copyrighted by Steam Room Stories

There are so many great episodes that are just so much fun to watch. The highlight for me is how the show is brilliantly written and the hilarious interactions between the guys in the steam room. In a recent episode, the guys are in the steam room discussing how men like to name their penises. I won’t go into much detail about this episode but let’s say that when viewing this episode it will have you in stitches. This episode also introduces the arrival of a new cast member, Charlie Merlo. If you are a fan of shows like The Talk, The View, or other formats, then think of this show as an extension of that type of set-up but with a hilarious twist.

We are recommending this show to everyone who enjoys watching hot shirtless guys engage in raunchy hot topics set in a steam room. New episodes air on the 1st and the 15th of every month.

Recommendation: Very High!

Official Link to the show:
https://www.youtube.com/user/steamroomstories

 

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F.A.V.O.R. Valentine

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Junior’s Cave  Music Interview                                                                                  with R&B Singer/Songwriter, F.A.V.O.R. Valentine                                       Early Fall (September 2014) Edition                                                                 Junior’s Cave Weekly Music Series

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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F.A.V.O.R. Valentine
Photo Credit: Jimmy Washington

We have a special treat for R&B music lovers around the world. Meet R&B Singer/Songwriter F.A.V.O.R. Valentine who showcases major vocal ranges that will drive the ladies crazy when they hear Valentine sings his soulful ballads. Heavenly influenced by many of the iconic soul singers of the music industry, Valentine prepares to show the world what he has to offer the R&B community. Here is his story that will shed some light on who is F.A.V.O.R. Valentine.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

F.A.V.O.R.: I would say soulful, sultry, universal, timeless and meaningful.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

F.A.V.O.R.: I would say R. Kelly!

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

F.A.V.O.R.: Yes it’s called “See You Again”.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

F.A.V.O.R.: I’m listening to Jasmine Sullivan and Bruno Mars.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

F.A.V.O.R.: I draw my inspiration from life experience and my favorite part is being able to sing what I’ve written.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

F.A.V.O.R.: I would say Cee Lo

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

F.A.V.O.R.: I love to cook

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

F.A.V.O.R.: Family, God, a piece of mind, Stability, and Knowledge.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

F.A.V.O.R.: I would say getting stuck in the airport for a week on a buddy pass.

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

F.A.V.O.R.: Yes! But I would have gone about doing it in different way however it made me who I am today.

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

F.A.V.O.R.: I would say culinary arts because I love to cook and entertain.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

F.A.V.O.R.: Staying true to whom you are and not letting anyone tells you no.

Isaac: Ten years from now what will be doing?

F.A.V.O.R.: Somewhere on the Grammy touring living out my dreams.

Isaac: As a send great off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

F.A.V.O.R.: Opening up for Freddie Jackson in Columbia South Carolina.

Official SoundCloud Music Page:
http://www.soundcloud.com/favor-valentine

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Noshir Mody

 

Junior’s Cave 
Music Interview 
with Fusion Guitarist, Noshir Mody
Early Fall (September 2014) Edition 
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Fusion Guitarist Noshir Mody
Photo Courtesy of Noshir Mody

Fusion Guitarist Noshir Mody masterfully commands his instrument that releases beautiful and intoxicating sounds that makes him a true gem to listen to in the music industry. Music without words tells wonderfully picturesque colorful stories that are heavenly to the ears. The talented and gifted guitarist has this amazing gift with his guitar displaying a beautiful tone, versatility, and inventive ideas. In our third online conversation with Mody, the artist gives our online publication updates on what he has been doing, a little more about his personal life, and the gift of his music. Here is what formulated for our delightful spotlight.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Noshir: Melodic, narrative, improvisational, engaging and immersive.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Noshir: Right now I’m very taken up with the work of Trilok Gurtu and Keith Jarrett. It’s always hard for me to narrow down this list to a few names as over the years I have heard and been influenced by a lot of great music and musicians. I seem to have most significant influences during specific periods of my life. When I started playing guitar, Al Di Meola was my biggest influence and then for a while after that, all I listened to was Satriani and Vai. Following that period, I was absorbed in the works of John McLaughlin, Pat Metheny, Zakir Hussain, Joe Zawinul and Miles Davis. More recently I have been intently listening to and enjoying the works of Ulf Wakenius. I don’t think there is any one artist that has been the primary influence on my sound or style.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Noshir: “Under A Starlit Sky” – I love how our performance of this song has matured. I recorded this song on my 2008 solo album “In This World With You” but when the group performs it now – the result is quite explosive, with a big dynamic range and sections that develop in tension and intensity. Performing in these improvisational settings without locking down the arrangements makes the songs appear to have a life of their own. They continue to grow and develop as different musicians and approaches are used in presenting them…

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Noshir: Currently, I’m engrossed in the albums “21 Spices” by Trilok Gurtu with Simon Phillips and the NDR big band and Keith Jarrett’s “Sleeper” with Garbarek, Danielsson and Christensen. I am also loving Dhafer Youssef ‘s “Abu Navas Rhapsody” and on the singer-songwriter front I am enjoying “The Ash and Clay” by The Milk Carton Kids. Great albums in my opinion, that deserve to be heard and enjoyed.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Noshir: My inspirations come from living life. Nothing out of the ordinary, the simple but meaningful moments – I’m sure all of us encounter them – moments of love, loss, laughter, conflict, imagination, hope, etc. It’s magical for me when subsequently melodies or harmonic progressions with varied rhythms appear, as if on their own, and recreate the sentiment of that moment – I love that part of the process.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Noshir: Sharing the stage with Trilok Gurtu or Zakir Hussain would be amazing-

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Noshir: I love the process of discovery – be it through meeting people or travelling or being introduced to new cultures and cuisines. I guess I would be seeking out venues for new experiences.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Noshir: In no particular order…love, loved ones, purpose, sustenance and art.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Noshir: Oh this is going back many years – I was inebriated and took the stage at a producer’s showcase and I have no idea how the rest of the night developed.

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Noshir: No. I was much younger and had just gone through some tough circumstances and looking back I guess it was a pathetic play for attention. I got none and in fact ended up alienating people more than attracting any sympathy or empathy.

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Noshir: I actually stopped performing and recording for almost seven years. Even though I was successful professionally, it somehow did not feel right. There was a void. I have a background in engineering and I’m good at it so that’s an obvious choice – however not having music as a means to express myself would present a pretty dull existence for me.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Noshir: At this stage of my life I try to keep it simple – use your common sense and be compassionate.

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Noshir: ….still persevering to make great, thought provoking art.

Isaac: As a sendoff, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Noshir: I have had many moments as a performer that have been very meaningful and memorable to me but I don’t really think of any of them as my greatest moments. One special moment that I can recall is after one of my shows with the quintet, at a jazz club in midtown Manhattan, a very distinguished looking lady approached me to thank me for the show and to take a picture with me. She turned out to be an ambassador to the United Nations and as her friend took the picture, she informed me that she was going to put that picture up on her wall, right next to the one with her and Chick Corea. That made my day.

Official Website:
http://www.noshirmody.com/

Official Facebook Music Page:
https://www.facebook.com/NoshirModyMusic

Ist Interview with our publication:
http://www.juniorscave.com/Noshir-Mody.html

2nd Interview with our publication:
http://blogs.juniorscave.com/2012/01/25/noshir-mody-part-2-2/

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