The Running Chickens

 

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Junior’s Cave 
Music Interview 
with Indie Band, The Running Chickens
Early Fall (August 2014) Edition 
MusicSUBMIT Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA

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Stevolaz & Budo are The Running Chickens

Great music comes from all over the globe, and this next band certainly proves this with their incredible sound. We are delighted to present the music of The Running Chickens. The talented duo, Stefano Dentone (Voice, Acoustic & Bass Guitars) and Marcello Dondero (Acoustic, Electric, Slide Guitars, Dobro & Mandolin) fit perfectly as the two musicians create a special blend of feel good music. We spoke to Dentone and Dondero recently about the band’s music and other fun facts that will make you an instant fan. Here is what developed from our marvelous online encounter.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

The Running Chickens: ROCK, ROOTS, BLUESY, DREAMY, ATMOSPHERIC.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

BUDO: The Allman Brothers Band, Pink Floyd, Mad Season.

STEVOLAZ: Elvis Presley, The Rolling Stones, The Allman Brothers Band…

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far? (secondo me intende una canzone della nostra collezione di dischi, non un pezzo nostro… io risponderei qualcosa del genere)

The Running Chickens: We don’t have a single favorite song to play… mostly it depends on our mood… sometimes it is in our song; sometimes it is one of the other artists.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

The Running Chickens: At this time we’re listening Matt Corby, Jeff Aug, Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires, Grayson Capps… but always we follow with interest the most famous Steven Wilson, Moe, Phish, Umphrey’s Mc Gees, North Mississppi Allstars, Jonathan Wilson… and superstars like Ryan Adams, Derek Trucks, Gov’t Mule or Ray LaMontagne.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

The Running Chickens: Inspiration is a strange thing and it depends by many factors: joy, anger, fear, disappointment, feelings, sadness… Everything could be an inspiration for the creative first step!
There is a moment when we combine our ideas… different perspectives come together in one… in that time we have “the promise” of a new song it’s a draft, it is not yet a finished drawing. Perhaps this is the most exciting moment, because we can give free hand to our imagination.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be? (io metto i tre che per me sono un sogno proibito, poi tu aggiungi chi vuoi :-))

BUDO: Phish, Gov’t Mule.

STEVOLAZ: Eric Clapton, David Gilmour, Neil Young.

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The Running Chickens Live @ Woodnight Rock Festival 2013

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

The Running Chickens: When we don’t play guitars, we are very normal people :-)… so we love running or go to the beach… we love drinking a good wine or a good beer… spending time with our women or friends… watching old movies on TV… very ordinary things!

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

The Running Chickens: Our women, our dogs, our guitars, our beers (or wine), the sun.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

The Running Chickens: Once we played in a very hot venue. The temperature was so high that our brains had gone haywire!!! We played our songs as always, but with strange arrangements… we were in a trance because the hot, so we improvised… almost like a jam session! At the end of the show, the audience was excited for the new things that we proposed!!!

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

The Running Chickens: Almost everything not really all that we have done. We made our share of mistakes.

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

The Running Chickens: Actually, we are the indies… we aren’t professional musicians we’d like to be able to live with the music! In any form, but with the music.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?
The Running Chickens: Being able to do it by yourself.

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

BUDO: teaching the guitar to my son.

STEVOLAZ: I have no expectations… I learned to live day by day.

Isaac: As a send great off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

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The Chickens playing live during 2013/2014 tour

BUDO: A few years ago, at the end of a show, I was approached by a very old man… He looked at me in the eyes and told me with pride: ”… you must not be afraid to play! You are the number one!!!”. I never knew who he was, but I’ll never forget him!

STEVOLAZ: Once we were playing outdoors and the police came to stop the concert… The crowd began to shout and protesting a few minutes later the police gone away and we start playing a crazy rock and roll stuff! It was exciting!!!

Photos used in this interview provided by The Running Chickens

Official Facebook Page:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Running-Chickens/365470056902431

53 total views, 10 views today

Laurelle

 

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Junior’s Cave 
Music Interview 
with Indie R&B, Pop/Hip-Hop Performer, Laurelle
Early Fall (August 2014) Edition 
MusicSUBMIT Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA

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Laurelle
Photo Provided by Laurelle

We are pleased to introduce to our readers of this online publication the sensational sound of R&B/Pop/Hip-Hop Performer LyndsiLaurelle” Hicks. Coming from a family background Laurelle is taking music to a bold new era. She does not shy away from pushing the envelope when it comes to making a statement with her music. In this recent spotlight with Laurelle, she reveals the many sides of who she is. Enjoy!

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Laurelle: Unique, futuristic, fun, dynamic, and self-expression.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Laurelle: I would definitely have to say Mariah Carey. The range of her voice is out of this world, and she has always managed to re-define herself through the years, and make amazing music that makes you feel good, and fun to sing along too. lol

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Laurelle: I really love my new song All The Way because it is such a different, but yet fun direction than all the others. This song combines a lot of different elements of music from R&B, to pop, and hip-hop. But one of my all time favorites would be Time. It’s a rejoice song that speaks about triumphing, and overcoming trials in your life. Something I feel everyone experiences one time or another.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Laurelle: So I really love all types of music, and I am kind of all over the map when it comes to music, but one band I am really loving right now is majic. They have a new song out that is called rude, which has an island feel, but with a modern twist. I also am feeling Kendrick Lamar, but that’s not to exclude all the greats. I also have to show love to Iggy Azela, and a new breakout artist Sam Smith. His voice is gorgeous. And you can never go wrong with Beyonce, Rihanna, Jlo, and many other of the mainstream artist out there.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Laurelle: I draw inspiration from my own personal experiences and things that people might experience on a day to day basis. I also sometimes write based on my current mood. It’s a great way for me to get out what I feel in an expressive way, and in a way I feel that comes across more transparent to the people. My favorite part about the process is receiving the tracks from my producer, and then listening and interpreting the sounds I hear.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Laurelle: Right now I would definitely have to say Beyonce. I mean the way she performs is electrifying. I feel like she would push you to put every ounce of your being into the show, and push you to your limits. That’s what being a great performer is all about.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Laurelle: I love spending time with my family and friends. Without the support from them, I don’t think I would be as far as I am now. So every chance I get I love to just be goofy and silly with them.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Laurelle: Oh my! lol That’s hard. lol. So 1. I can’t live without sweets. lol I am a sweets fanatic. 2. getting my eyebrows done lol. I sear I have the bushiest eyebrows, so Im constantly getting them done lol. 3. Going to the movies. I actually have a movie go-er card, and am constantly getting free stuff. 4. having retail therapy. lol. I think every girl can relate. lol 5. going out and exploring new and exciting things.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Laurelle: You know thankfully I haven’t had any real run in’s with trouble yet. lol. but I guess if I had to say the only real problem was my music stopping mid way. lol

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Lorelei: You know, honestly no. I have been through a lot to get to where I am at now in my life, and I am thankful for all the things that have happened good, and bad. I think these things have helped shape me into the person I am now with my music and my personal. Life is about making mistakes, so you should never regret anything because what came to pass was what was suppose to happen. Like my mom always says no use crying over spilled milk.

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Laurelle
Photo Provided by Laurelle

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Laurelle: I am a talker and have no problem talking someone’s ear off. Lol, I have always dreamed of working in E entertainment as an entertainment journalist/broadcaster. And then in hopes to one day own my own channel.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?
Laurelle: I have quite a few but one that I love from my dad is to never expect things, or people act a certain way to towards you in life. That way you will never be disappointed, or let down when they don’t do or act in a way you feel you would. You can’t be responsible for other’s actions, but you can be responsible for your own. So always watch your actions.

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Laurelle: Owning my own businesses, along with still performing, and enjoy having a family of my own.

Isaac: As a send great off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Laurelle: One of the best moments I had, was after performing with a band I was once apart, a young teenage girl came up to me and told me how much she loved my sound, and then advice about what to do as far as direction, and where to start in her career. She then told me how nervous she was to sing because of what people may say, but she then proceeded to sing for me. That honestly was one of the best feelings to know I touched her life.

Facebook Official Page:
https://www.facebook.com/lyndsi.hicks.9

57 total views, 9 views today

Blee

 

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Junior’s Cave 
Music Interview 
with Indie Hip-Hop/Reggae Artist, Blee
Early Fall (August 2014) Edition 
MusicSUBMIT Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Blee
Photo Provided by Blee

It’s our pleasure to present to our online readers a soulful fusion of Hip-Hop, Reggae, and Dance Genre with the fantastic music of Indie Hip-Hop/Reggae Artist, Blee. It is this innovated combination of different genres that has resonated something within us that we cannot get enough of listening to Blee’s music. The young, gifted, and talented artist recently spoke to us about his music and other great things we are proud to present in this newest spotlight. Here is what formulated from our wonderful online meeting.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Blee: Fusion of Hip Hop, Reggae & Dance music!

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Blee: Bob Marley, 2Pac, Buju Banton

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Blee: Yes, there is a song from Chapter 3 that I can’t get enough of called ‘What Year Is This?’

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Blee: Right now my playlist is completely random with songs from the likes of John Denver to The Eagles to DMX. In terms of Hip Hop right now, though, listening to a lot of Brother Ali and Talib Kweli. Reggae is also on daily rotation in my headphones as well. Would definitely recommend checking out Chronixx and Proteje who are currently spearheading a revival in Roots Reggae and making some great music in the process.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Blee: My process writing process is normally guided by the instrumental.  It’s very rare that I would write lyrics first and then try to build an instrument around it. I love it when I am dreaming of a song and try to remember it when I wake up. I normally have my phone nearby, ready to record a voice note of the melody, but so many songs have been lost in that gap between dream and consciousness…. still the magic continues.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Blee: It would have to be Nas and Damien Marley.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Blee: On the rare occasions that I find myself with spare time, I like watching documentaries, particularly anything that looks at how we can improve as a civilisation and a society. Love ‘The Zeitgeist Movement’ series and do what I can to promote and push those idealogies forward. We should be doing a lot better as an intelligent species in terms of wealth distribution and quality of living standards for all people. I also enjoy a bit of gaming when I get the chance….more into RPGs like the Final Fantasy series.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Blee:
Human interaction
A home cooked meal
Pen and paper
Privacy
Freedom

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Blee
Photo Provided by Blee

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Blee: Well, when I’m in a new city, I like to take a solo tour to take in the environment at my own pace. There was this one time, I won’t mention where I was, that I was just walking and talking with this guy who I assume thought I could supply a particular type of product. Anyway, somehow we ended up in a fairly abandoned area where there were some of his associates obviously waiting to be supplied as well. When I revealed that he made the wrong assumption, things got a little tense but I managed to muscle myself out of there.

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Blee: Well to be honest, I still do tend to do my little solo tour of new cities I visit, but I guess I’m just more careful about who I talk to.

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Blee: Well, I do have a 9 to 5 that I’m holding down at the moment alongside my music that helps to pay the bills, but I think if the music wasn’t in my life, I would be in the medical research field.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Blee: Respect Your Legacy, (which is the title of Chapter 2 of The Black Lion Chronicles), it has many interpretations, but to me it serves as a reminder that no matter what the problem you face in life, love is the only solution worth exploring.

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Blee: In my lab on my own island working on some top secret experiments.

Isaac: As a send great off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Blue: It would have to be once when I decided to do a random open mic session with a guitarist I was working with. We did an acoustic version of one of my songs called ‘I Love You’ which is a song dedicated to my son and after the performance this guy came up to me and shook my hand with an iron grip to show his appreciation for the song but was so overwhelmed with emotion that he ended up hugging me. It turns out the song resonated with him so much he was moved to tears. There something about seeing a grown man with a pint getting emotional that sticks with you. It’s moments like these that keep me creating.

Official Website:
http://bleebox.com/
http://www.bleeworld.com

51 total views, 8 views today

Carnival Seasons

 

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Junior’s Cave 
Music Interview 
with Indie Rock Band, Carnival Seasons
Summer (July/August 2014) Edition 
MusicSUBMIT Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Carnival Seasons
Photo Provided by Carnival Seasons

We had the great pleasure to speak via online to the Indie Rock Band Carnival Seasons about their highly energetic, super-charged, and aggressively crafted rock/metal sound that makes them stand apart from others in the Indie Music Scene. We were delighted to learn from members Nick Reese (Singer/Songwriter), Danathan Nguyen (Lead Guitar), Andrew Melancon (Rhythm Guitar), Daniel Kristoff (Bass, Drums, and Keys), and Alex Stoll (Drums and Bass) on how the band works perfectly together to blend all of their influences into a sound that is creating a nice buzz in the Indie Music Circuit. One of the best parts to the band’s music consists of Nick Reese’s amazingly strong Rock Voice that adds to the magnificent flavor of the band’s signature sound. Here in this in-depth spotlight, we get the 411 on exactly who are the Carnival Seasons.

Isaac: It is a pleasure to speak with you via this important online conversation. I have a chance to review your press kit, and I am must say that I am impressed, excited, and thrilled about your music. What do you think you will add to the Indie Music Genre that will set your music apart from others?

Alex: It’s funny, because our music has a little twist of so many different genres and styles. A combination of Daniel’s jazz inspired bass groove, Andrew’s aggressive metal/rock influence, Danthan’s blues style influence, Nick’s versatile vocal range, and my own take on the drums, it really becomes something different, you know?

Nick: Thank you, I am glad you liked it. Our energy and edge. We hail back to the old days of rock music and I think it really shows.

Andrew: I believe that we can give a tougher side to an indie scene, which, to me, is kind of lacking in that area.

Daniel: I think that with a lot of the bands shifting towards a more electronic sound, that being centered on more of an organic rock sound does set us apart from others.

Danathan: I think we place a focus on an older rock sound that isn’t the first thing people would think of when they hear the word “indie”. At the same time, we’ve touched upon the more pop side of things.

Isaac: What has been your inspiration for pursuing a music career?

Alex: When I watched the 2005 Green Day Live in Milton Keynes’ show, It really got me inspired to play music. It really made me want to be in a band and play for people. Tre Cool and Travis Barker are my idols! Tre for his cool fills and Travis for his smooth speed, But recently with twenty one pilots coming into the industry, their drummer inspired me to smack the heck out of my drums, really give it all I got you know?

Nick: It all really started when I was transferred to another school in my freshman year. Everyone there played instruments, and sang. It really opened up the world of music to me, and would cause me to buy my first guitar.

Andrew: Well it started when I first got into rock and roll. I thought about how much fun it would be to play up on stage in front of thousands of people. I really was inspired by the music.

Daniel: The first time I started playing music I couldn’t think of anything else I’d rather do I’d rather try and find a way to do what I love than do something I regret doing.

Danathan: Being able to make music with my friends and perform in front of people has been my inspiration.

Isaac: Why is music important to you?

Alex: Music is important to me, because it shows the true character I am, not as a performer, but as an actual human being. It teaches me how to express my emotions and my creativity. If I’m playing just some same old simple beat with no expression, or just standing in one place, not moving around, people aren’t going to think much of me. Music is my best way to tell and share myself with other people. What your own life was like or how personal something was to you. It helps you step out of your comfort zone and go above and beyond!

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Carnival Seasons
Photo Provided by Carnival Seasons

Nick: It’s important to me because it fuels the culture of our world. A song heard in England can bring out certain emotions, that same song heard in China will garner those same emotions. It’s the language of the world.

Andrew: It is inspiring. It is moving. I can’t think of any other art form that has connected people the same way music has. I can’t live without it.

Daniel: I think music is important to me because I can convey what I want to convey when words aren’t enough It has allowed me to connect more with the people who like the music I play.

Danathan: Music is important to me in many ways, but the most significant for me is that it speaks to me in a way nothing else can. Some things can only be expressed through music.

Isaac: How has the whole experience of being on stage performing for what you love to do help you grow as an artist?

Alex: It’s helped me be more confident as a both a musician and as a person.

Andrew: Well, for starters, I’m not really nervous in front of crowds anymore. The more I play, the more comfortable I am. Also, I’ve learned to not beat myself up for little things that go wrong. I guess you can say I’ve grown more relaxed.

Daniel: I try to not draw attention to them also I never stop playing and then fix it later.

Nick: It made me come out of my shell. I used to be so afraid to be myself, always thinking that people wouldn’t like me. Once I got on stage for the first time I realized that I could truly be myself, be happy.

Danathan: It’s definitely taught me how to take more control over my instrument and to have more confidence in how I play, which is something I’m always working on.

Isaac: How do you handle mistakes during a performance?

Alex: Just shake it off and keep playing what you are playing, don’t let it throw off your entire performance as well as the rest of the group’s performance as well.

Andrew: Like I said, if it’s little, I’ll generally brush it off. But if it’s a recurring mistake, even if it’s miniscule, I’ll take a step back, work on my playing, and fix it. I generally don’t get nervous, but if I am, I’ll just try to relax. Let go of my surroundings, and focus on the performance.

Nick: I take them in stride. I can’t always be perfect, but I do my best to bring a certain quality to the performance. If I make a mistake, I can usually pick up on it before it happens, feel it coming almost. I just work around it.

Danathan: I just move on, keep playing, and not think about it… until after the shows over.

Isaac: Do you get nervous before a performance or a competition? If so, what do you do to overcome your fears?

Alex: I do indeed. I find it normal to become nervous before I play. If you’re too cocky and over confident, you may go out too relaxed. Being too relaxed could mean you could make a lot of mistakes. You have to be focused. In order to overcome my nerves, I escape my own reality, and just focus on what I’m playing, locking in with the others surrounding me.

Andrew: I’m not really nervous in front of crowds anymore. The more I play, the more comfortable I am.

Nick: I wouldn’t say nervous and much as I’d say excited or anxious. I am incredibly impatient when I’m excited and it only fuels my fire to perform. I can’t really remedy them, I guess sort of distract myself to pass the time. A game of Tetris or something like that.

Daniel: Yes, there are times when I get nervous but I feel that my passion for what I play and a strong drive to give the fans what they want and what I think they will enjoy overcome that nervousness.

Danathan: I do get nervous on certain levels. I don’t think I’d want to continue doing this if I didn’t have the same feeling every time before hitting the stage; it’s the thrill that makes it so much fun. Playing the first song or two usually helps me overcome that.

Isaac: Do you ever experience writer’s block when you are writing new songs? I can imagine this would be particularly annoying if you were in a collaborative situation. If you have in the past, what do you do to get over it?

Alex: You’d really have to ask Nick about that. I handle mostly the drum aspect but I do sometimes help Nick brainstorm when he gets stuck.

Andrew: That’s a question for Nick.

Daniel: Usually lyrics flow pretty naturally when I’m in the right mood.

Nick: Of course. I get it all the time, but what I usually do in that situation is just write anything. You know keep the gears turning even if it isn’t something I will actually use. I write songs every day, most of them I will never use for anything.

Danathan: I do. I like to take a break from it and come back to it later. When you leave it alone for a while, you usually return with a new mindset and ideas.

Isaac: What advice have you received from mentors about pursuing a music career?

Alex: Really get the feel and understanding of your instrument and that it’s not just an inanimate object, but your companion. Always strive to be better then you are.

Andrew: Don’t expect anything. There are no guarantees. Don’t think that someone’s gonna have to hand you a record deal or whatever just because you’ve got an album out. You’ve gotta’ put in work. It’s tough, but if you persevere, it’s worth it.

Nick: Try to learn from those who have already done it. That’s how I got an edge above many of the other musicians around here. Knowledge is power!

Daniel: The music business is probably one of the toughest businesses to get into but with enough passion hard work and a plan you will eventually find a niche for yourself in the music business.

Danathan: I’ve never received any advice about pursuing a career in music.

Isaac: What advice would you give to beginners who are nervous about pursuing a music career?

Andrew: Don’t immediately try to pursue a career. Just have fun. If you and your band are good enough, see where it takes you. Bottom line is, if you’re not having fun at the start, you’re not gonna have fun in the end.

Alex: Have fun. Don’t let the negative things said by others impair you. Prove them wrong, also know that sometimes they are actually giving you that push or strive you need to show them who’s boss.

Nick: To be smart about it. Always understand every aspect possible, because if you don’t you will encounter situations that will leave you baffled, and scratching your head in confusion. Expect something and nothing at the same time. That way you will always feel surprised.

Daniel: I would tell them that if you plan on pursuing a music career you need to find people that you work well with in and out of music.

Danathan: Write good songs and hone your craft. Do what makes you happy.

Isaac: With so much diverse music currently out, do you feel that your type of music is still relevant or important in today’s music industry? What do you feel makes your music stand out for the rest?

Andrew: I’d say our music stands out because it’s diverse. We all come from different backgrounds, and it shows in our music. Well go from heavy hard rock to progressive rock to punk and then rap it all up with a soft/alternative jam.

Daniel: I think that there are certain genres of music that will always remain popular and I feel that the genre I play will always be relevant to the music industry.

Alex: Of course. I feel as if we are one of the very few bands in our area that has stayed relevant or have stuck together, no matter the problems we ran into. Many of the bands we’ve played with barely lasted 6 months, because they felt that it wasn’t working out for them anymore. No matter the issues we’ve faced, we managed to pull it off, keep doing what we love doing, and showed everyone that we won’t stop for anything. For us, our music isn’t just that same punk rock beat with the same 3 to 4 power chords. Each song is unique in its own way. Different tones. Different beats. Different rhythms. If you listen to our music you will notice that they have little to no similarity to each other.

Danathan: I think our type of music is definitely relevant. There are so many great rock bands out there. I think our music stands out from the rest because our songs don’t all have one particular sound and one song may be surprisingly different from another.

Isaac: How does music affect you and the world around you?

Andrew: Music is always around me. I’m always hearing the music amidst the dissonance of daily life. Music is my life and I can’t go without it.
Daniel: When I listen to a song, I really like I usually I can’t stop smiling for the rest of the day. Music can take your thought process anywhere depending on the type of music.

Nick: It takes me out of it when I need to, or highlights it into something better.

Danathan: Music connects everyone; it’s a universal language and that’s something important in a world of so much diversity. It’s how I’ve made many of my friends.

Alex: It can bring people together and I love that.

Isaac: Do you believe music is something that everyone should enjoy?

Andrew: Because everyone can enjoy it. Because it’s entertaining. Because it evokes different emotions. Music is a part of every culture and is a product of human creativity. Music is, well, music.

Daniel: I believe that music is something everyone should enjoy because there are different types of music for different types of people.

Nick: I think it is incredibly important, especially right now. Music is becoming so soulless, contrived, drained, and bland. We are trying to develop the sounds of old with a new take on it. People are actually saying Rock is dead, and that may be true but it’s not because people are uninterested, but because people just aren’t bringing anything to the table.

Danathan: Most definitely.

Isaac: What do you think about downloading music online?

Alex: I think bands should be happy that people are willing to give their music a shot. They just want to be able to listen to it before anyone else could get a hold of it.

Danathan: I prefer having a tangible copy of my music. I still buy CDs when I can. That being said, I’m neutral about downloading. People should be able to listen to music conveniently and whenever they want, and at the same time, musicians should be compensated for their work.

Nick: I am honestly against it for obvious reasons. People tell me “Well how will I know I like them if I can’t hear it first for free?” That’s what live shows are for! Get into the band that way. There are too many excuses for why people download.

Alex: Music is like telling a story from your life. You want to embrace it, show the world what you are made of, and the struggles you’ve been through. Some of the more popular songs on the radio today just feel slapped together and emotionless.

Andrew: Well. No matter what laws are put in place, piracy is piracy and it will always be around. Am I against downloading, No. Will it stop anytime soon? No.

Isaac: Do you find that your songs typically touch people as much as they touch you?

Daniel: I think most people enjoy the music I play but when someone feels the same way I do about the music I play I feel that’s more of a special occasion at the moment.

Alex: I find a lot of the songs touch me deeply. But I feel as if in order to be touched by the song, the audience has to feel it first. When the audience feels touched by the songs, that’s when you know you’ve done well.

Danathan: I hope they do. I’ve had people tell me that one of our songs, “Dry”, speaks to them. Whether people think one of our songs is catchy or they emotionally connect to one, it means the world to me.

Nick: I’d like to think so.

Isaac: When you are in songwriting mode, who are you thinking about when gathering your thoughts for your lyrics?

Daniel: When I’m in songwriting mode usually the lyrics flow naturally but when I find it harder to wright lyrics sometimes I think about experiences in my life.

Danathan: You’d have to ask Nick that question.

Nick: So far I love to write conjoined stories. This record we put out follows the same young man through every song. A crucial time in his life is performed for you on the album. I base him off myself, people I know, or I have met. Even with that album out of the way I find myself creating a new protagonist/antagonist for my songs, there is no doubt the next record will be a story as well.

Isaac: How prolific are you with respect to your songwriting skills? Do you believe it is a meticulous process to create your lyrics or do the lyrics flow naturally?

Danathan: Anything I do in respect to songwriting usually will come in the form of a bridge or small ideas. Again, you’d have to ask Nick that.

Alex: I pretty much focus on the drum side of things. You’d have to ask
Nick for real details.

Nick: I prefer to not have an opinion of myself. I let my bandmates decide for me regularly. If they like it, I know I am on the right path. But there are times where I go with my gut and tell them to trust me, because I’ll have something I want to come across as is. I am a mixture of both really, it could be a process or it could be right then and there. It really all depends.

Daniel: I try to let it flow naturally I don’t really have an opinion of myself as a songwriter yet.

Isaac: What skills/personal attributes are most important to being successful in this music business? How do you promote your music and shows?

Alex: Being able to bring it both in the studio and especially live. That’s where people really get to form an opinion of you. We promote mostly over the internet and word of mouth.

Nick: Like I said before. Knowledge is power. I learn everything about the music industry, because it gives me a more than significant edge over the average musician. We use Facebook and good old fashioned word of mouth.

Andrew: I think I bring sturdiness to the live shows over all sound, and good energy. But I am still learning.

Danathan: I believe success is subjective. Success for me was releasing our first album. This came from a lot of patience, hard work, and persistence and I think those things are crucial to achieving any goal. We promote by using our Facebook and personally asking people to check out and share our music and come to our shows.

Daniel: I think being business savvy, hardworking, and creative leads to success.

Isaac: If you had an opportunity to work with one of today’s hottest artists or group, who would it be and why?

Nick: I really love what Young The Giant is doing right now, their second record is honestly just as, if not more amazing than their first. I’d also like to work with The Black Keys or Jack White. They are doing some incredible things right now and to be honest I would probably listen to what they have to say, rather than actually contribute haha.

Alex: Hmmm. Probably Taking Back Sunday or Panic At The Disco. I would sure love to be involved in their energy and how much passion they put into the lyrics, songs, and instruments.

Andrew: Surprisingly, Daft Punk. They’re both very talented, and I really enjoy their music. I’d be interested to see what we can create together, and what I can learn from them.

Danathan: I’d love to work with The Black Keys. They have such a cool vibe with each of their songs and their groove is great.

Isaac: Who are your favorite musicians? Groups? CD’s?

Andrew: Jimmy Page was my first guitar hero, Hetfield is my inspiration for rhythm guitar, Guthrie Govan is one of the best and one of the most versatile guitarists around, Abasi, is one of the most innovative guitarists around, and he’s a pretty nice guy (yes, I’ve met him), and Petrucci is my favorite guitarist, because I love his music.

Alex: Travis barker from Blink 182. Josh Dunn from Twenty One Pilots, Mark O’Connell, and Adam Lazzara from Taking Back Sunday. I don’t have a favorite album in particular, I’m open to a lot and each album is unique in its own way.

Nick: Brian Setzer from The Stray Cats has always been a favorite of mine. Ah so many to choose from Jack White, Albert Hammond Jr, Freddie Mercury, Robert Plant, Dave Abrussee, Eddie Vedder, Julian Casablancas, I could go on forever. The Strokes, Pearl Jam, Nirvana, Muse, Queen, Led Zeppelin, The White Stripes, The Shins, Smashing Pumpkins, again I could go on. I’ll keep this one my 8 favorites. Pearl Jam – Ten, Led Zeppelin – Zeppelin 2, CCR – Green River, The Killers – Hot Fuss, The Strokes – Is This It, The White Stripes – The White Stripes, AC/DC – Back In Black, and AC/DC Highway To Hell.

Danathan: Some of my favorite musicians and groups are John Mayer, Taking Back Sunday, Radiohead, Eric Clapton, and Switchfoot. A band I wish that was still around is The Academy Is… My favorite records include Continuum by John Mayer, Santi by The Academy Is…, Disraeli Gears by Cream, In Rainbows by Radiohead, The Beautiful Letdown by Switchfoot, and Louder Now by Taking Back Sunday. I could really go on but those are the first that come to mind.

Isaac: Which famous musicians do you admire? Why?

Alex: Definitely Travis barker, Not only is he a talented musician who gives 110% in what we he does, but he is also a great father to his kids. Always picking them up from school, taking them on his tours, etc. He is a hard worker and a very humble person. He inspires me to be the best that I can be.

Andrew: Guitarists: John Petrucci, Jimmy Page, Guthrie Govan, James Hetfield, and Tosin Abasi. Groups: Dream Theater, Led Zeppelin, ACDC, Metallica, Rush. Albums: Metropolis PT. 2 Scenes From A Memory, Dark Side of the Moon, Zeppelin 2, Octavarium, Master of Puppets.

Nick: I admire Jack White because of his connection with the old blues. He keeps it alive in his music, but only a trained ear will hear it I suppose. B.B. Kind is amazing that man, is almost 90 and plays 100 shows a year! Dave Grohl is one of my all-time heroes; the guy just persevered through the fame of Nirvana and created his own just as creditable project. Eddie Vedder because of how honest he is as an artist and songwriter, I always felt a sort of kinship with the man, maybe it’s a shared love of the ocean?

Danathan: I admire John Mayer because he’s not only a great songwriter but also a very skilled guitarist. I have many other influences but to talk about them all would take a while.

Isaac: The Internet plays an integral role with artists getting their music out to the masses. Do you have your own website and what will fans find there?

Alex: We use our Facebook page as our website mostly.

Nick: We use our Facebook page as our home base I guess you could say.

They will find all things Carnival Seasons there Music, Photos, Merchandise, Videos, Etc.

Andrew: Facebook, word of mouth. Skills: luck.

Danathan: We don’t have a website yet, but you can find us on Facebook.

Isaac: At the end of the day, are you happy with where you are at professionally?

Alex: I am truly happy as of before and now. Could never be happier knowing that everything is slowly graduating and increasing. I see many good things happening in future. No doubt.

Daniel: Not yet.

Andrew: Not yet.

Nick: Not really there is far too much to be done for me to be happy just yet.

Danathan: I am. However, I’d love to have more people hear our music.

Isaac: Who would you like to dedicate this interview to and why?

Alex: Definitely to my mom and the rest of the band. Without all of them, I wouldn’t be pushing myself to do what I love doing to this day, stepping out of my comfort zone and having so much more confidence than I’ve ever had in my whole 21 years.

Nick: I’d like to dedicate this interview to everyone who has supported us throughout our 3 year life as a band. My appreciation for them is unparalleled.

Andrew: To anyone who ever doubted me.

Danathan: I dedicate this interview to my friends, especially the ones that have listened to our music or have come out to shows. They’re the people that make it seem worth it at the end of the day.

Daniel: I dedicate this interview to all of my loved ones.

Official Facebook Page:
https://www.facebook.com/CarnivalSeasons?ref=br_tf

263 total views, 5 views today

Changing Faces Beauty with Miracle Hempel

Buy clinical skin care at Beauty.com!

Chemistry.com

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T
I
P
S
Summer 2014
Bi-Monthly Beauty Tip

Summer Time Basic Essentials

 

Changing Faces Beauty

with Miracle Hempel

Miracle Hempel is a makeup artist located in Honolulu Hawaii with more than 8 years of experience in a variety of settings. She loves to bring spice to any style with makeup using looks from fresh and natural to the latest beauty trends. Providing her clients with the basics is very important during her routine to promote longevity in beautiful and healthy skin because what is underneath is what really brings your beauty to the surface.

For questions, comments, bookings, or consultations, please send inquiries to:beautychangingfaces@yahoo.com.

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Early Summer 2014 Edition

Ohhh LaLa Morange
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By: Miracle Hempel
Published: June 24, 2014 8:01 PM EST

Miracle Hempel’s
Fun Summer Make-Up Tip:
July/August 2014 Edition

Learn more about her
Latest Make-Up Advice!

Access Page For Full Article Here:
http://juniorscave.com/Changing_Faces_Beauty.html

168 total views, 1 views today

Holworthy Hitz

 

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Junior’s Cave 
Music Interview 
with Indie Rap Artist, Holworthy Hitz
Early Summer (June/July 2014) Edition 
MusicSUBMIT Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Holworthy Hitz
Photo by GrandSlam

Holworthy Hitz has a story he wants to tell, and he is using music as the perfect outlet to let others know about his life. Hitz is passionate about getting his message out to the masses and honing in on his craft. Hitz also has a deep respect for Jay-Z and is developing his own business side of the music industry that he hopes will set him apart from others. In this spotlight with the Indie Rap Performer, Hitz reveals his amazing story with our online publication.

Isaac: It is a pleasure to speak with you via this important online conversation. I have a chance to review your press kit, and I am must say that I am impressed, excited, and thrilled about your music. What do you think you will add to the Indie Music Genre that will set your music apart from others?

Holworthy Hitz: Appreciate the interview and your time. What I know will set my music apart from others is it’s unique. I bring a lot of energy with my music. My music is very passionate and real. You won’t just get one style when it comes to me. It is a message. I represent Orphan life is…it is a way of life, it is more than music.

Isaac: What has been your inspiration for pursuing a music career?

Holworthy Hitz: My inspiration for pursuing a music career is not seeing my father alive since I was 12, my dead brothers, my son, my family, and my hood.

Isaac: Why is music important to you?

Holworthy Hitz: Music is important to me because it is an outlet for people like me. I release stress writing music. I send messages writing music. It can open doors for my peers.

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Holworthy Hitz
Photo Album Cover Provided by Holworthy Hitz

Isaac: How has the whole experience of being on stage performing for what you love to do help you grow as an artist?

Holworthy Hitz: Being on stage always helped me grow as an artist because one always learns new things about the music people like. It gives me confidence and it drives me to keep going.

Isaac: How do you handle mistakes during a performance?

Holworthy Hitz: I actually don’t remember a mistake I made during a performance as far as choking on stage but if I slip or the mic cord gets tied up, I never panic. I’ve learn to be professional.

Isaac: Do you get nervous before a performance or a competition? If so, what do you do to overcome your fears?

Holworthy Hitz: I never get nervous before a competition because I’m confident, this is my specialty.

Isaac: Do you ever experience writer’s block when you are writing new songs? I can imagine this would be particularly annoying if you were in a collaborative situation. If you have in the past, what do you do to get over it?

Holworthy Hitz: Of course, I have writers block usually when I’m not focus and thinking about other things. I would stop and pick it up later…it’s natural. In a collaborative situation, I would have a clear mind before going to the studio period because it’s business and business does not care about emotions and writers’ block. Sometimes the artist I’m collaborating with would send me the beat days ahead of the studio time so that works also.

Isaac: What advice have you received from mentors about pursuing a music career?

Holworthy Hitz: The advice I receive is, “be yourself and stay confident”.
“Work hard…don’t make excuses”. One thing I never forgot was ‘’it’s bigger than music’’.

Isaac: What advice would you give to beginners who are nervous about pursuing a music career?

Holworthy Hitz: I feel like if you’re nervous about a music career the only way to break that is to try. Music in these days is different. Anything is possible now. Learn more about the music business before you jump in.

Isaac: With so much diverse music currently out, do you feel that your type of music is still relevant or important in today’s music industry? What do you feel makes your music stand out for the rest?

Holworthy Hitz: My type of music will always be relevant because it is passionate lyrical music and things people go through every day in life. So 100 years from now when I’m gone people will still relate.

Isaac: How does music affect you and the world around you?

Holworthy Hitz: Music affects me deeply. It is the reason I’m still alive. It affects the world around me because the world around me is the people around me and they get motivated by my music.

Isaac: Why do you believe music is something that everyone should enjoy?

Holworthy Hitz: People should enjoy music because like I said it is an outlet for the listener and the one who makes the music.

Isaac: What do you think about downloading music online?

Holworthy Hitz: Downloading music online is a great way for people to get the music who are not in your city or state. You want the world to hear you not just your area.

Isaac: Do you find that your songs typically touch people as much as they touch you?

Holworthy Hitz: Yes! I do find my songs touch me and my friends and my fans the same. I make music for the people; I talk about my life and theirs in my music.

Isaac: When you are in songwriting mode, who are you thinking about when gathering your thoughts for your lyrics?

Holworthy Hitz: In songwriting mode, I’m not thinking about anybody…I’m thinking about lyrics, melodies, and harmonies. I’m mostly thinking about the song I’m writing.

Isaac: How prolific are you with respect to your songwriting skills? Do you believe it is a meticulous process to create your lyrics or do the lyrics flow naturally?

Holworthy Hitz: My lyrics mostly flow naturally but there is a thought process involved on where and how to say words in my song. It’s not as easy as people think. I don’t just put down words I send a message and make sense.

Isaac: What skills/personal attributes are most important to being successful in this music business? How do you promote your music and shows?

Holworthy Hitz: The skills that are important are the knowledge of the industry you’re in and how it works. Nowadays, when you know more, you can do more. I promote my music online through Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and through Gmail as well as to radio station and online magazines like you guys.

Isaac: If you had an opportunity to work with one of today’s hottest artists or group, who would it be and why?

Holworthy Hitz: If I had the opportunity to work with an artist, it would be Jay Z. The reason would be because of his experience and business knowledge. I can learn a thing or two from him. If it were a group to choose from, it would be the LOX. Guys like Styles P, Jadakiss, and Sheek Louch I grew up on listening to their music, and they were a big part of my motivation. I relate to a lot of their music.

Isaac: Who are your favorite musicians? Groups? CD’s?

Holworthy Hitz: Well as you heard…The Lox is my favorite artist because I grew up listening to their music; I have been listening to their music since I was around 12, 13 years old.

Isaac: Which famous musicians do you admire? Why?

Holworthy Hitz: I admire Jay-Z because he is not just an artist, but he is a business man. He understands both sides of this business and became successful from it. His ambition to be better is like no other.

Isaac: I agree! He is my all-time favorite rap performer.

Isaac: The Internet plays an integral role with artists getting their music out to the masses. Do you have your own website and what will fans find there?

Holworthy Hitz: Yes, I do have my own website. It is Orphanlife44.blogspot.com.
If you go on that website you will find all my videos I did. You will be able to download new and old music and book shows from my website.

Isaac: Excellent.

Isaac: At the end of the day, are you happy with where you are at professionally?

Holworthy Hitz: Right now I’m happy that I’m alive. As far as my career, I’m happy I’m taking the steps like going to school for audio and production, my work ethic has picked up, and I’m starting to think more like a business man. Deep down inside I know I can and will be greater. So I’m happy but not satisfied.

Isaac: Who would you like to dedicate this interview to and why?

Holworthy Hitz: I would like to dedicate this interview to all the Orphans and lost children. My dead brothers, Boston, my whole hood, Holworthy St., Humboldt Ave, and Homestead St . Also, my family, my engineer, camera man and friend, Grandslam. He works beside me and put a lot of work ethic into this project.

343 total views, 5 views today

Melissa Fielding

 

Junior’s Cave 
Music Interview 
with Indie NYC Singer/Songwriter, Melissa Fielding
Early Summer (June/July 2014) Edition 
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Melissa Fielding
Hide & Seek Me Photoshoot
Crown Heights, Brooklyn
Photographs taken by Alexis Lambrou
http://www.alexislambrou.com

Indie NYC Singer/Songwriter Melissa Fielding is a musical colossal of pure talent. She sings and writes music that matters and speaks to a generation. It is her connection to everyday themes such as love, loss, loneliness, happiness, and insanity to name a few that sets her apart from other Indie Performers.  We were delighted to get an opportunity to interview an amazing performer in this week’s spotlight. Here Fielding shares her story with our online publication. Here is what transpired from our online encounter.

Isaac: It is a pleasure to speak with you via this important online conversation. I have a chance to review your press kit, and I am must say that I am impressed, excited, and thrilled about your music. What do you think you will add to the Indie Music Genre that will set your music apart from others?

Melissa: Hi, yes, thank you so much! I feel like I add a fresh perspective on a lot of universal themes—love, loss, loneliness, happiness, insanity. I have experienced all of these just like so many other people, but I try to write about them in new ways and different styles. One of my songs is about depression in the form of soldiers dancing in my head. Another song is a very surreal take on the feeling of belonging. And then of course, I have some straight up love/loss songs that can break my own heart over and over again. I write about what I know, but I try to do it in a way that’s new yet still relatable for the listener.

Isaac: What has been your inspiration for pursuing a music career?

M: My main inspiration, outside of my music ones, would be the people in my life—particularly my family. As a two year old, I would sing very loudly in inappropriate places (like the library). And instead of snuffing out that desire to sing, my parents encouraged me to develop it. They’ve supported all of my decisions to pursue music at every step of the way. And my brother has been my champion, telling anyone who will listen that they need to hear my music. I’ve loved music since a very young age; my family gave me the courage to develop that.

Isaac: Why is music important to you?

M: Music is the best and most effective way for me to release my emotions—which, anyone who knows me will tell you, I have a ton of. I need that catharsis, be it through listening, playing, or writing music. It’s what makes the tough days easier and the good days more enjoyable.

Isaac: How has the whole experience of being on stage performing for what you love to do help you grow as an artist?

M: I’m still coming into my own as a performer, even though I’ve been doing it for ten years or so in some capacity or another. Each time I get on stage, I still feel awkward and fumbly, but that might just be because I am still awkward and fumbly in my everyday life (I trip a lot). It helps me to grow because I don’t let that stop me from getting up there. I try new things, some of which actually work, and then take it from there for the next performance.

Isaac: How do you handle mistakes during a performance?

M: Just keep going really, which is obviously easier said than done. But letting mistakes trip me up would ruin what is otherwise a great time! I want a great show for the audience—the people who made it a point to come see me or decided to stay while I was on. I want to have fun and a mistake or two aren’t going to ruin that! Besides, a few mistakes give it that authentic live feel, right? Hahaha.

Isaac: Do you get nervous before a performance or a competition? If so, what do you do to overcome your fears?

M: Almost always have and probably always will, at least a little bit. I just do my best to focus—practice, breathe, know where I need to be beforehand. And then when that doesn’t work, I talk to someone I find comforting who ultimately helps me to remember how much I love this. The rest sort of mellows from there.

Isaac: Do you ever experience writer’s block when you are writing new songs? I can imagine this would be particularly annoying if you were in a collaborative situation. If you have in the past, what do you do to get over it?

M: When I was in college, we had this assignment where we had to write a song based on something we found on a ripped out page from the newspaper. I got this huge advertisement for some department store, so not a ton to work with, but I wrote probably one of my favorite songs out of that exercise. These days, I like to read Charles Bukowski to try to spark something when I’m a little tapped out. Sometimes it’s just as simple as taking a break—letting your mind reset by coming back to it later.

Isaac: What advice have you received from mentors about pursuing a music career?

M: Develop thick skin—not everyone is going to like you, some people might hate you and make sure you know it. Don’t let that stop you; be persistent. And the obvious, write good music, hahaha.

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Melissa Fielding
Hide & Seek Me Photoshoot
Crown Heights, Brooklyn
Photographs taken by Alexis Lambrou
http://www.alexislambrou.com

Isaac: What advice would you give to beginners who are nervous about pursuing a music career?

M: Definitely the same things I was told—don’t just give up. Also, take criticism constructively, not defensively. Listen to what others have to say, and use what you think is helpful. Remember that you don’t have to take anyone’s advice, but be open to it. And play your damn heart out. Just really lay it all out there.

Isaac: With so much diverse music currently out, do you feel that your type of music is still relevant or important in today’s music industry? What do you feel makes your music stand out for the rest?

M: Yeah, definitely. No matter what the medium is, people will judge a work largely on being able to connect to the story it is trying to tell. If there is still a story worth telling that others can relate to, then it is definitely relevant today. I pride myself on my lyric writing, particularly. I feel like my music stands out because the lyric is both relatable and atypical. I try to play with line structures, rhyme scheme, both consciously and unconsciously, to sort of mess around a little bit with what the listener might expect. I like to take something familiar and make it different, a little stranger if I can. Strange is good in my book, hahahaha.

Isaac: How does music affect you and the world around you?

M: As I mentioned before, I can be all sorts of emotional; music helps me to work these feelings out in a constructive way.  And it’s just downright enjoyable. I love to listen to music all of the time, for every mood. And the beautiful thing is that I can do that, no problem. I have music for when I’m happy, sad, angry, energetic, relaxed, etc. and it’s all amazing.

Isaac: Why do you believe music is something that everyone should enjoy?

M: The incredible thing is that no matter who you are or what your life is like, there is always going to be some sort of music out there for you. And it really helps to express whatever it is you want or need to express without having to necessarily say anything. It connects everyone in a way that nothing else really can.

Isaac: What do you think about downloading music online?

M: Downloading music and listening to music online, in general, is the new way to get music directly to the fans. Hardly anyone I know actually buys CDs anymore, which is sort of sad in a way, but it’s also 2014 so it makes sense. Digital is the new-wave, and I think some of the laws need to be adjusted to suit this changing environment. Especially with platforms like Spotify and Pandora, which are great for getting music out there, but not so much for revenue and making a living… We need new laws that fit the needs of the listeners without hurting the artists.

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Melissa Fielding
Hide & Seek Me Photoshoot
Crown Heights, Brooklyn
Photographs taken by Alexis Lambrou
http://www.alexislambrou.com

Isaac: Do you find that your songs typically touch people as much as they touch you?

M: I hope so, haha! Overall, the response seems to be that most people, at least feel my intention behind the song if they don’t actually feel anything themselves.

Isaac: When you are in songwriting mode, who are you thinking about when gathering your thoughts for your lyrics?

M: A lot of my songwriting stems from my personal experiences, so it really just depends which ones I’m drawing from at the time. My exes get a lot of thought time, haha. And any love currently in my life too, be it family, friends, or a guy. Sometimes I think about myself, particularly when it comes to songs about, ya know, losing my mind temporarily.

Isaac: How prolific are you with respect to your songwriting skills? Do you believe it is a meticulous process to create your lyrics or do the lyrics flow naturally?

M: I have a lyric book that I carry with me most of the time, plus at least 10-20 little notes and voice memos on my phone. I find that for me, forcing myself to write for X minutes per day just makes me a tiny bit resentful. So instead, I like to jot down small notes here and there until I can take a full 2-3 hours at home a few times a week in front of the keyboard or guitar and just try to pull something out. When I’m lucky, the lyrics just sort of come out… but I never stay lucky long enough to get a full song. Usually a verse and a chorus will come to me, and then I’ll sit there just staring at the page thinking “Awesome! But, uh… now what?”

Isaac: What skills/personal attributes are most important to being successful in this music business?  How do you promote your music and shows?

M: Persistence and the ability to network. Can’t be afraid to meet new people and get their information—make those contacts! Promotion is key, and I use all of my social media outlets to promote my music and my shows… but these are all things I’m still working on.

Isaac: If you had an opportunity to work with one of today’s hottest artists or group, who would it be and why?

M: St. Vincent is super dope. She’s just got this air about her that screams “cool;” her performance style is super interesting and the music is just killer. Also, definitely Lucius. They’re just amazing—their whole look and sound is incredible. I’ve seen them live twice and both shows are still in my top 10.

Isaac: Who are your favorite musicians? Groups? CD’s?

M: This is a hard list to keep concise, haha. Fiona Apple, Adele, Amy Winehouse are all top picks. And obviously St. Vincent and Lucius. I also really love the Beatles (particularly “Abbey Road”), Bon Iver, Regina Spektor. I miss the Civil Wars, and Death Cab for Cutie will forever stay in my heart. Oh, and Robyn. Her album “Body Talk” is everything I could ever want when I need to dance.

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Melissa Fielding
Hide & Seek Me Photoshoot
Crown Heights, Brooklyn
Photographs taken by Alexis Lambrou
http://www.alexislambrou.com

Isaac: Which famous musicians do you admire? Why?

M: Adele. She’s easily my biggest musical inspiration. I mean, she’s just so incredibly talented. She doesn’t let anything stop her, and remains super grounded despite her insane success. Plus, I love her cackle. That laugh gets me every time.

Isaac: The Internet plays an integral role with artists getting their music out to the masses. Do you have your own website and what will fans find there?

M: Yes! Today is completely a part of the digital age, so an online presence is definitely important. My website has all my music, information on upcoming shows, photos, videos, contact information, etc. It also has all of my social media information—Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, etc.—which is a great way to connect. My website is www.melissafielding.com.

Isaac: At the end of the day, are you happy with where you are at professionally?

M: I’m very happy with where I’m headed. I’m just starting out and still getting myself/ my name out there. It’s tough, and it can get frustrating, but it’s so exciting and beyond worth it. I’m looking forward to everything that’s still to come.

Isaac: Who would you like to dedicate this interview to and why?

M: Really to anyone who has listened to my music and though, “Yeah, I could get down with this.” I make music as much for myself as I do in the hopes that others will also enjoy it. Particularly dedicated to my family & friends for their nonstop love and support of this crazy ride.

718 total views, 8 views today

Carl Thornton

 

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Junior’s Cave 
Music Interview 
with Indie Pop/Dance LBGT Singer/Songwriter, Carl Thornton
Early Summer (June/July 2014) Edition 
Miles High Productions Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Carl Thornton
Photo Provided by Carl Thornton

Indie Pop/Dance LBGT Singer/Songwriter Carl Thornton is making a big splash on the Indie Music Scene with his hit club banger Get UP! One of the best parts of Thornton’s music is his fun-spirited, positive, fun messages, and catchy hooks that certainly will add to the flavor of Pop/Dance Music genre. Being originally from the great state of North Carolina, Thornton moved at the young age of three with his parents to Long Island, New York. It is this move that afforded him the great opportunity to begin singing at the age of seven in an elementary school chorus.  His love for performing was born and thus his epiphany came to him that singing is what he wanted to do with his life. The rest as they say, was history. This publication is proud to present the story of Indie Pop/Dance LBGT Singer/Songwriter Carl Thornton in this marvelous spotlight. Here is what transpired from our fantastic encounter.

Isaac: It is a pleasure to speak with you via this important online conversation. I have a chance to review your press kit, and I am must say that I am impressed, excited, and thrilled about your music. What do you think you will add to the Indie Music Genre as an openly LBGT Male Artist that will set your music apart from others?

Carl: An African American male presence, one who is confident and proud of who he is. I wanna be a trail blazer and to show young gays that it is perfectly alright to “walk in truth”. To live, love and be free to express who you are to the very core of your being. As far as being set apart, I’m just being me and believing that this indeed will be enough.

Isaac: What has been your inspiration for pursuing a music career?

Carl: I am my own inspiration; music has been a vital part of my life since I was a young child.

Isaac: Why is music important to you?

Carl: Music is as important to me as breathing and it has help lift me out of some very dark moments in my life, when I had nowhere else to turn, I could always rely on it to lift my spirits and fill me with a Joie de vivre.

Isaac: I love your new single Get UP! It is a real club banger. What do you want music lovers to take away from this single?

Carl: Joy! To celebrate life, allow themselves to be in the moment and let the rhythm move them to the depth of their being.

Isaac: Being that you are just getting your start; are you nervous about the whole experience of being on stage performing for what you love to do? And give us a little about what you want your whole stage presence will be like?

Carl: Although I have performed for a while now, I still get nervous. I always give my heart and soul into my songs and performance so my stage presence will be one that is high energy. I want the audience to have a great time with me and my music!

Isaac: How do you think you will handle mistakes during a performance?

Carl: It may sound a bit cliché’, but “never let them see you sweat!”

If a mistake happens on stage, I will keep the show going and stay professional, mistakes happen it is a part of being at “live theater”, the show must go on.

Isaac: Do you get nervous before a performance or a competition? If so, what do you do to overcome your fears?

Carl: I do get nervous, yes indeed, still, but what I do is deep breathing, inhale and exhale slowly and this centers me. Along with an inner dialogue saying “you can do this Carl!”

Isaac: Do you ever experience writer’s block when you are writing new songs? I can imagine this would be particularly annoying if you were in a collaborative situation. If you have in the past, what do you do to get over it?

Carl: I have experienced a block, but I find taking a breath for a moment helps to re-invigorate my creativity.

Isaac: How does music affect you and the world around you?

Carl: It never ceases to amaze me how powerful music can be, it can build bridges cross-culturally, it’s healing, soothing, and it evokes feeling deep within the human soul.

Isaac: What do you think about downloading music online?

Carl: I am okay with downloading music, technology is changing and I feel that it helps indie artist get their music out to the masses and introduces us to the public. It is a great forum for indie artists today.

Isaac: Do you find that your songs typically touch people as much as they touch you?

Me: I was pleasantly surprised that it did just that touch so many people, yes.

Isaac: If you had an opportunity to work with one of today’s hottest artists or group, who would it be and why?

Carl: Most definitely, Pharrell Williams. He has had a huge impact on the industry, his music is incredible, he’s accomplished, and his style is second to none.

Isaac: Who are your favorite musicians? Groups? CD’s?

Carl: Pharrell Williams, Calvin Harris, Avicci, Robin Thicke, and Usher.

Isaac: The Internet plays an integral role with artists getting their music out to the masses. Do you have your own website and what will fans find there?

Carl: I have my own website yes, Carllthornton.com, there fans can find updates on my bio, updates on my performances and schedule, pictures and videos. And my single “Get Up!” of course.

Isaac: Excellent!

Isaac: Who would you like to dedicate this interview to (shout outs)?

Carl: My mom, who has been my biggest cheerleader, thanks Mom!

340 total views, 2 views today

Stefan Albert

 

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Junior’s Cave 
Music Interview 
with Composer/Guitarist, Stefan Albert
Early Summer (June/July 2014) Edition 
MusicSUBMIT Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Stefan Albert
Photo Credit: Citronenrot

Composer/Guitarist Stefan Albert is a master in delivering music that ignites passion and creates magic. His background as a composer and his love for classical music are his biggest assets that certainly add to why his music is receiving rave reviews. Albert spoke to us in this format recently about his music, the release of his new album, and where his music fits in with today’s diverse Indie Music Industry. Here is what transpired from our marvelous online encounter.

Isaac: It is a pleasure to speak with you via this important online conversation. I have a chance to review your press kit, and I am must say that I am impressed, excited, and thrilled about your music. What do you think you will add to the Indie Music Genre that will set your music apart from others?

Stefan: Hi Isaac, it’s also a pleasure for me to get this interview and perhaps get more attention to my new acoustic guitar album “MÄANDER”. When I started with the first song (Suntar Gad), there was no intention to create a new album, much less enrich the Indie Music Genre with something special. I only started again playing guitar for fun, after a longer period of composing classical music for solo and orchestra instruments. After 3 songs, I got the idea to create an album.

The music comes out of improvisation, a flow like a course of a river. The music combines different styles and guitar techniques which I have learned in my life, like classical, rock, blues, picking. Important for me was to make music from the heart, very emotional, slowly, to give the listeners the possibility to create their own dream pictures and to relax in this fast world.

I think every human being is apart from the others and if you are authentic, your music sounds like it. My music sounds like me, I cannot and I don’t want to change it.  If people like it, I am happy, if not, they can listen one of the other wonderful music, which exists in the world.

Isaac: What has been your inspiration for pursuing a music career?

Stefan: There was no inspiration; I have done it my whole life. I couldn’t do anything else. My wish to play guitar was born with 5 years, but I had to wait until my mother made it possible for me. First, like much others, I had to learn the recorder (boring).

But I didn’t give up until with 9 years I got my first guitar. There were no influences of family or others, or music. But I felt, that music is my way and the guitar was and still is my first love. Perhaps from an earlier life?

Isaac: Why is music important to you?

Stefan: For me, music is the breath of life. You can get or transport emotions with it.

If you feel bad, you can listen to music, which helps you to process your problems.  You can feel (good) with music, dancing and singing. And to make music, is to be a step deeper inside of all. I thinkyou are more attached with the universe.

Isaac: How has the whole experience of being on stage performing for what you love to do help you grow as an artist?

Stefan: I think, the most important is, that you know deep in your heart and your soul that you want to make music, whatever happens. Then you do it, later you try to go on stage.

And if you come to the stage you have new problems to solve, like: yourself, are you on edge, nervous or not? The organizer, stage, mixing, light, the audience.You can learn every concert something new and of that you can grow.

Isaac: How do you handle mistakes during a performance?

Stefan: Nobody has the wish to make mistakes during a performance. But still it happens.

So, for me, the best is to do like nothing has happened and to think forward. Mistakes are human.

Isaac: Do you get nervous before a performance or a competition? If so, what do you do to overcome your fears?

Stefan: As younger musician, playing classical concerts, there I was really nervous.

I have tried several things like: breathing, forgetting, pills and wine…, but nothing has helped, I had to go through. Later I learned, if I do not want to improve me and the audience, how “good” I am, I lost nervous.

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Stefan Albert
Photo Credit: Monika, Omnia Tewfik

Isaac: Do you ever experience writer’s block when you are writing new songs? I can imagine this would be particularly annoying if you were in a collaborative situation. If you have in the past, what do you do to get over it?

Stefan: When I have played in a band, I hadn’t had this problem, because I could speak about it with the others and somebody could help. As a classical composer, sometimes you can not go forward in the composition, there, my teacher told me, don’t loose time in searching here the problem, it’s to find earlier in the composition, you have gone somewhere the wrong way and now you have reached a dead end. Find the point.

If you have real writers’ block, about a longer time, two things:

1.) Write down everything what comes in mind, without thinking and judging. You have to write out the whole bullshit, which is in you.

2.) Be patient and believe in you, during you try the first point.

Isaac: What advice have you received from mentors about pursuing a music career?

Stefan: No advice, never. I can remember at someone, who said to me: I would be stupid to give you good advice, because some years later you are my rival!?!

Isaac: What advice would you give to beginners who are nervous about pursuing a music career?

Stefan: Go inside you, ask you if you really want to give up everything for music and if I say everything, I mean everything! And if you are sure, be strong, hard-working, patient, believe in you and your music and be happy.

Isaac: With so much diverse music currently out, do you feel that your type of music is still relevant or important in today’s music industry? What do you feel makes your music stand out for the rest?

Stefan: It’s not important for me, if my music is important in today’s music industry or stand out for the rest. I am happy in doing my music for me and for people, who loves it.

It’s me, I shall not change my music because the mainstream is changing.

Isaac: How does music affect you and the world around you?

Stefan: It’s the only language of the world, which everybody can understand and speak.  Music connects people.

Isaac: Why do you believe music is something that everyone should enjoy?

Stefan: Because music is better than drugs.

Isaac: :-)

Isaac: What do you think about downloading music online?

Stefan: The Internet gives the chance to be heart of the whole world, and it’s better than 20 years before. But on the other side, music is changing faster and gets more and more worthless. Years ago, when you have waited for the new physical album of somebody, it was something special. Today, you can download the music digital, it’s wonderful, but not special.

Isaac: This is a great statement.

Isaac: Do you find that your songs typically touch people as much as they touch you?

Stefan: I hope so.

Isaac: When you are in songwriting mode, who are you thinking about when gathering your thoughts for your lyrics?

Stefan: I think about life and love, good and bad things, wishes and dreams.

Isaac: How prolific are you with respect to your songwriting skills? Do you believe it is a meticulous process to create your lyrics or do the lyrics flow naturally?

Stefan: I think it’s both, and it really depends of the song and your mood at this day.

Isaac: What skills/personal attributes are most important to being successful in this music business? How do you promote your music and shows?

Stefan: You have to be: strong, hard-working, patient, convinced about yourself and your music.

For promoting, I use the Internet, like the others do. Unfortunately, I am not good in promoting me.

Isaac: If you had an opportunity to work with one of today’s hottest artists or group, who would it be and why?

Stefan: If they would like to play with me, I should take every hot artist, because it’s nice to play big concerts.

Isaac: Who are your favorite musicians? Groups? CD’s?

Stefan: I love so much music of dead and live musicians, so I cannot name all.

Only some: Beethoven, G. Mahler, Bach, Segovia, Paco de Lucia, Al de Meola, Beatles…

Dire Strates, Cansas, Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, Pink Floyd…

Isaac: Which famous musicians do you admire? Why?

Stefan: My most famous Composers are L.Van Beethoven and Gustav Mahler. Their music is very complex, emotional and strong.

Isaac: The Internet plays an integral role with artists getting their music out to the masses. Do you have your own website and what will fans find there?

Stefan: Yes, I have my own websites.

1.) www.stefan-albert.net

There you can find all my classical musicI have done.

2.) http://www.reverbnation.com/acousticguitarmusicstefanalbert

There you can listen to my new acoustic guitar album MÄANDER, and you can look up some pictures as well as read some press releases about the album. You can also see the shops, where you can download my music.

Isaac: At the end of the day, are you happy with where you are at professionally?

Stefan: Yes, I think so.

Isaac: Who would you like to dedicate this interview to and why?

Stefan: To my sisters and friends and all people who love music, because I love them. Thank You.

325 total views, 5 views today

Roy Has Fire

 

Junior’s Cave 
Music Interview 
with Indie Rock Band, Roy Has Fire
Early Summer (June/July 2014) Edition 
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Roy Has Fire
Photo Credit: James Tucker

Mateo Villa (Bass, Vocals), Oliver Bean (Lead and Rhythm Guitar), Derek Monsen (Percussion), and James Villa (Lead and Rhythm Guitar, Vocals) are the members of the Indie Rock Band, Roy Has Fire. It was in the summer of 2007 when James Villa met guitarist Oliver Bean at a summer music camp.  It should be noted that the summer music camp was a Rock & Roll Boot Camp put on by Supercat Studio.   The best part to this encounter was that J. Villa and O. Bean instantly hit it off and begin writing songs together.

Knowing the two young talented musicians needed to further pursue this new joint venture they soon enlisted the talents of James’ younger brother Mateo. Once Mateo joined the band they wasted no time booking their first gig. The complete formula to this band’s fantastic sound was when the band members contacted former summer camp attendee Derek Monsen. It was this eclectic style of music backgrounds that added to formulating the band, Roy Has Fire. In one of the best bands’ music interviews our online publication has conducted, the members of Roy Has Fire share their story with our magazine. Here is what formulated from our online encounter.

Isaac: What do you think you will add to the Indie Music Genre that will set you apart from others?

Mateo: I think we bring a lot to the table.

Oliver: We have jazz elements, and funk elements as well as rock.

Derek: I think what we have is that we’re open to more genres.

James: We all have sort of different backgrounds. We like all kinds of music but we also have experience in different genres. Oliver and I have a jazz and blues background, and Mateo brings a pop and funk influence to the table. Oliver has exposure to some really interesting diverse music.

Derek: It gives us a lot of flexibility musically. Also we’re young and we started really early so we still have a lot of growth ahead of us. I think Mateo was only twelve when we started.

Isaac: What has been your inspiration for pursuing a music career?

Oliver: It’s always been really fun and it brings people together. It makes me feel supported and it’s a way for me to support other people.

James: I’ve just always felt that it was my best way of communicating and getting my feelings out there.

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Roy Has Fire
Photo Credit: James Tucker

Mateo: Let’s just say he wasn’t always the best at communicating with words. (laughter).

James: Well, music has just always been my passion.

Derek: I always grew up around music, especially classic rock. It’s always been something I’ve been good at and enjoyed.

Mateo: I have a lot of fun doing it, and if I didn’t I wouldn’t want to do it. And I am the lead singer… (laughter).

James: Don’t you want to talk about your big brother who got you into music? (laughter).

Mateo: I kind of found my way, by myself. (laughter) When I created the band… (big laughs).

No, but yeah, I’ve always pictured myself being in a rock and roll band. (general agreement).

Isaac: Why is music Important to you?

Oliver: It makes me feel better. When I’m down, it brings me up and it connects me with people.

James: It’s a universal way to communicate.

Mateo: It’s always there for you, and it doesn’t matter what emotion you have, there’s always a type of music for the emotion you’re in.

Isaac: How has the whole experience of being on stage performing helped you grow as an artist?

James: Performing is totally different than writing and playing on your own. It teaches you how to work as a band and be professional on stage.

Mateo: And if I can interrupt for a minute. Remember how you used to be so shy and you wouldn’t sing on stage, and now…

Derek: It’s helped with all our shyness, I think performing on stage has given me good life experience in a lot of ways, like being on time, working as a team, public speaking, you know, the whole nine. It’s a huge confidence booster when you get compliments after a show.

Mateo: When you’re on stage and you hear the crowd screaming it’s the biggest reward.

Oliver: It teaches you how to listen, not just to your bandmates, but also to the crowd.

Derek: And it teaches you how to improvise. (general agreement).

Isaac: How do you handle mistakes during a performance?

Mateo: We usually just blame it on each other (laughter). To be honest, it is usually Oliver’s fault (laughter).

Derek: No, actually, I think what we really do is hide our mistakes really well.

Mateo: I think what it is, is that we are the only ones who really notice our mistakes now, and we just keep going.

Derek: And because we turn them into something good they become part of the performance and they’re not even really mistakes.

Isaac: Do you get nervous before a performance or a competition? If so, what do you do to overcome your fears?

Derek: I don’t think we really get nervous before shows anymore. We’re pretty used to it. We only really get thrown by technical difficulties during set up, and we’re pretty good at improvising there if we need to.

James: My opinion of that is that there’s still nervousness, but I’ve never thought of it as nervousness, just excitement and adrenaline. Like, you don’t know what’s going to happen this time…

Derek: Yeah, it’s not really nervousness if you turn it into anticipation and excitement…

Oliver: It’s like, you look around, at what’s about to go down, and it gets you excited, but you just have to temper that a bit take a deep breath and remember that this is what you’ve been practicing for.

Mateo: I get more nervous about if there’s going to be a crowd, and if they’re going to like us. It’s not about whether we can play well or not.

Isaac: Do you ever experience writer’s block when you are writing new songs? I can imagine this would be particularly annoying if you were in a collaboration situation. If you have in the past, what do you do to get over it?

Oliver: We have the opposite problem… we have so many ideas… (general agreement).

James: The songs so far that are done usually come out of one person’s experience, and then the band jams on it. The lyrics are the last thing to come out.

Derek: Our writing strategy is, and I think this helps add to our diversity, is that two of us will write together, and another time two different ones will write a song, kind of like what the Beatles did. Like, one time John and Paul would write a song together, and another time Paul and Ringo would write a song together, and so on. Sometimes we avoid conflict by not collaborating… (laughter).

Derek: At the same time, the only thing we do separate is the rough draft, and then we pull the song together as a band.

James: We usually come up with different ideas, and we’re all different songwriters, but then we have a vision altogether of where we want to go.

Mateo: It’s just as easy to clash with ideas too.

James: with lyrics, it’s about trying to put my feelings about what I’m going through into the song.

Derek: The problem I usually have with lyrics is getting that catchiness, that memorability that we want.

Mateo: I think the way we write is like a diamond shape. We start with one or two people, and then it goes to the whole band, and then it goes back to one or two people to polish it up.

Isaac: What advice have you received from mentors about pursuing a music career?

James: Focus on your singles. It’s about getting your stuff out there as fast as you can. And remember why you’re doing it, if it’s not fun don’t do it.

Isaac: What advice would you give to beginners who are nervous about pursuing a musical career?

Derek: Just stay committed!

Mateo: I think a lot of it is, don’t doubt your abilities.

James: Just be ok with where you’re at now. No one starts as a master… unless you’re ^%#%$* Beethoven.

Mateo: if you had heard us back when I was 12, and where we are now, it’s amazing the difference.

Derek: All of us, individually, and as a group, have come a long way.

James: If you’re doing a band thing, make sure that you like the people you play with, because it has to be fun.

Mateo: Yeah, cause now we’re stuck with Derek. (laughter).

Oliver: And always be prepared for anything…

Mateo: Because things WILL go wrong (more laughter).

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Roy Has Fire Performing Live at the Kootenanny Festival
Photo Credit: Joseph Reiner

Isaac: With so much diverse music currently out, do you feel that your type of music is still relevant or important in today’s music industry? What do you feel makes your music stand out from the rest?

Mateo: Actually, I think that our kind of music is getting more and more popular.

Derek: The electronic music fad is starting to die out, and the older music…

Mateo: Not even the older music, but getting back to songs with real instruments…

James: I think we write music that fits well with current trends but we are not limited to those styles.

Isaac: How does music affect you and the world around you?

James: Music is everything and everywhere. It changes the way people think and the way they act.

Derek: It’s a two way street. Music affects the world and the world affects music.

Isaac: Why do you believe music is something everyone should enjoy?

Derek: For everyone, there’s a kind of music that relates to them, and what they’re feeling.

Mateo: Music is a language without words. Everyone speaks music.

Isaac: What do you think about downloading music online?

James: it’s actually a good way for everyone to get their music out there.

Oliver: It cuts down on waste. Everyone can access the music they love.

James: If you’re listening to the music, everyone is winning. If you want to support the bands, you can.

Oliver: There are so many bands that I never would have heard of if I couldn’t hear them online before I was able to pay for them.

Derek: I think people want music to be free, but they still want to support the musicians.

Mateo: You’re not getting the money from selling CDs, but you’re getting more exposure.

Isaac: This is so true. Good insight guys.

Isaac: Do you find that your songs typically touch people as much as they touch you?

Mateo: Do you find that you typically touch people? (laughter).

Isaac: :-)

James: Mostly in the evening, because that’s when I’m most creative. (laughter).

Derek: Our songs touch people almost as much as we touch ourselves. (laughter).

James: Ok, music is a really good way to express yourself and move people. I’m going to say move instead of touch.

Derek: We hope that our music can inspire the world to be a better place.

James: We hope that in the future we will be touching a larger audience. (laughter).

Isaac: When you are in songwriting mode, who are you thinking about when gathering your thoughts for your lyrics?

James: It’s usually about a thing, or an experience, or a moment in life, more than a person. (general agreement).

Isaac: How prolific are you with respect to your songwriting skills? Do you believe it is a meticulous process to create your lyrics or do the lyrics flow naturally?

Derek: Sometimes they flow naturally and sometimes not.

Mateo: Sometimes we’re meticulous and sometimes we’re not.

Isaac: What skills/personal attributes are most important to being successful in this music business? How do you promote your music and shows?

Derek: We’re in a really great community. The local radio station has really supported us. The venues have supported us. Charity organizations have really supported us. We use Facebook and other social media to promote ourselves.

Isaac: If you had an opportunity to work with one of today’s hottest artists or group, who would it be and why?

Oliver: Personally, I would say MGMT. Because they’re writing music that’s just becoming more and more interesting over time.

Mateo: A band that I would like to collaborate with is Arctic Monkeys. Also, Young the Giant and the Black Keys. All of those would be awesome!

Derek: Another one is Bruno Mars. (general agreement).

Mateo: So Bruno Mars, if you’re reading this, we’d love to collaborate with you. (laughter).

James: Actually, Ben Gibbard from Death Cab for Cutie. (general agreement) He’s a great songwriter, and the way he makes music flow together…

Isaac: I tend to agree.

Mateo: He’s a great musician…

Isaac: Who are your favorite musicians? Groups? CDs?

Oliver: So Pink Floyd is a huge influence for me. Shine on you Crazy Diamond is one of my favourite songs. Coldplay. They are really interesting melodically and have a really great grasp of atmosphere. High speed is my favourite song of theirs. A lot of cool guitar sounds in that. Radiohead, yeah. Tool …

Mateo: You can see how you get your interesting time signature stuff from them.

Derek: I’m going to toss Van Halen in there. Great drummer. Van Halen 1984 was my first album that I owned. It’s great technical drumming that you can still enjoy. I really like the Black Keys, that modern bluesy rock style. I like a lot of jazz drumming and I’m really a big fan of Ray Charles.

James: I would say when I first started playing I really wanted to just shred solos like Slash, but now I’m more into Jack White’s style. More simple and tasteful. I like his raw blues sound. I got a lot of writing influence from Death Cab for Cutie and Radiohead.

Mateo: I’ve been influenced forever by, mostly because of the lead singer, Queen. (general agreement). Another artist that I’ve been listening to a lot more lately is Stevie Ray Vaughan. If I can get to 30% of where he was at, I’ll be doing great. I think a lot of our funky grooves came from the Red Hot Chili Peppers (general agreement).

Isaac: The Internet plays an integral role with artists getting their music out to the masses. Do you have your own website and what will fans find there?

James: As of right now most of our stuff is on Facebook, and we’re working on our website.

Oliver: We’re on Facebook, SoundCloud, and CBC music. If you want to support us you can buy our music on BandCamp.

Isaac: At the end of the day, are you happy with where you are at professionally?

Mateo: We’re on a small tour this summer, and that’s great.
James: I think we’re exactly where we should be if we’re looking to do something with this band.

Derek: We’re constantly improving and heading in the right direction.

Isaac: Who would you like to dedicate this interview to and why?

Oliver: This interview is for our fans and all those who have supported us, especially our parents without whom getting to most of our gigs would be impossible. I would like to give a big thanks to my mom for helping us get the grant funding our current tour and everything else she has done for the band.

Official Band’s Facebook Page:
https://www.facebook.com/royhasfire

426 total views, 2 views today

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