DJ Don X

 

 

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with DJ/Producer, DJ Don X
July/August 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

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DJ Don X
Photo Courtesy of DJ Don X


by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA

Greatly influenced by the King of Pop Michael Jackson DJ Don X is carving out his own niche of greatness. He merges the cultures from the various metropolitan areas in which he has resided – Lagos, New York, Maryland and Washington DC. It is his mastery of being one of the most versatile DJs/Producers currently out in the music scene that makes him a true gem. DJ Don X consistently is appealing to a wide range of ear drums as far as music is concerned. We have the great opportunity to speak to DJ Don X about the direction his career is heading, some of his other musical influences, and other cool facts about the entertainer. Here is what developed from our online encounter.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

DJ Don X: In 5 words, I’ll say it is diverse, simple, unique, engaging and borderline cosmic.

Isaac: What is your musical background? Do you have a musical family or did you just fall into songwriting all on your own?

DJ Don X: As far as my musical background goes, my parents listened to a wide variety of genres and I got hooked on just enjoying good music at a very early age. But, as far as my current musical path, I think of it more as a calling rather than my falling into it.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?
DJ Don X: As far as my influences go, I know it will sound a bit cliché but Michael Jackson tops that list in that he showed the need and ability to adapt with the musical time of any era and that’s what I like to do in my being really eclectic when it comes to music. Also on that line up are Afrojack, Tiesto, Fela Kuti, Femi Kuti, Jazzy Jeff among many.
Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

S DJ Don X: o far I’d say Gugu Gaga but my latest release; X marks the spot is fast becoming my favorite to play based on the crowd response to it.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

DJ Don X: Oh wow! Right now I’m listening to a lot of afrobeats and the afrobeats EDM fusion.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

DJ Don X: I draw inspiration from any and everything literally I can be in the middle of a conversation and hear a sound or phrase and it’ll spark an idea which inevitably leads to creating a new tune.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

DJ Don X: Right now it’ll be between Pitbull or Afrojack as I’ll love the challenge of helping build u that crowd’s energy.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

DJ Don X: Hahahaha! I watch a lot of drama/ adventure shows and do quite a bit of travelling while trying not to think of the next gig I have lined up.

Isaac: I can imagine that you have experienced writer’s block from time to time. I imagine this would be particularly annoying if you were in a collaboration situation. If you do, what do you do to get over it?

DJ Don X: True. What I have learnt over time in order to deal with this is not to force it. At some point, sooner hopefully than later; the creative force will flow and it does help if you have a muse handy.

Isaac: How do you feel about MP3s, Napster and other organizations like them?

DJ Don X: With the path the digital age has taken, it is just one of the unavoidable changes to the industry that artists have to adapt to and utilize to our advantage.

Isaac: Do you think online music is playing a large part with respect to where the music industry is heading in the future?

DJ Don X: Yes it is. The music industry has shown it is ever evolving as evidenced by the way music is accessed today. From the A track to the Cassettes to CDs to wav and mp3 files; the goal has been to make it easier to discover. Being able too make your music readily available to your target audience plays a huge role primarily because I think it gets your art to a wider audience in a very short period of time.

Isaac: Where do you see songwriters fitting into that equation?

DJ Don X: I think there will forever be a need for songwriters. Take for example with the invention of the internet, people presumed there will be no more need for printed materials but we soon found out that the opposite was the case. With the access to so much information, people needed to print even more so also I feel with the ability to create and distribute music currently, there will be an increased need for quality content from songwriters.

Isaac: Do you feel this type of technology is a good thing for Indie Artists or a bad thing?

DJ Don X: Depends on how it is being managed. It can definitely be a good thing as you have more control of your material and can also inevitably shape your own musical image.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

DJ Don X: Oh! Haha well.. my phone, my MacBook, my external hard drive, access to high speed internet hahaha and my headphones.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

DJ Don X: Trouble.. hahaha well I won’t really say trouble but there was this one gig that I did and it had the audience really close to my equipment and those at the front were so hype and excited that they a few bumped into my table and knocked my laptop down which as you can imagine I wasn’t very happy about. As a result, I stopped playing and they got a little rowdy and security had to step in. I did later continue as the crowd started chanting and not leave. So yeah! That’s about as much trouble as I can let you in on Isaac.

Isaac: :-)

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

DJ Don X: Hahah in that case, I have learnt to have security close by if such a scenario was to repeat itself
Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

DJ Don X: Oh wow! I can’t really think of any alternate reality where I wasn’t performing. Its hard to phantom as to me, performing is like breathing. Maybe I’ll be the owner of some multi billion dollar technology company, hahaha.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

DJ Don X: Nothing good comes easy. You have to put in work even if it yields no immediate results while always being prepared for any opportunity that comes your way.

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

DJ Don X: Named as one of the greatest and most versatile DJs/Producer in the world :-)

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

DJ Don X: Honestly, it is really really hard to narrow down one moment that stands out the most as I feel each performance I have been privileged to do is special. But a few stand out, a tour I did in the UK and Africa where by I can never forget the energy I got from the crowd. It was overwhelming having that much influence on that many people and being able to make them forget their problems, let lose and see how much fun and how happy they were in that moment. It really is a blessing to be able to do what I do and impact people in such a unique way. Those I would say are the greatest moments for me as a performer.

Much love and respect to your readers – Don X

Thanks for this opportunity Isaac and keep up the great work!

Official Website:
http://www.djdonx.com

Other Social Media:
Facebook.com/djdonx
Twitter.com/djdonx
Instagram.com/djdonx
Soundcloud.com/djdonx

Alison Brook

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with Christian Folk/Pop Singer/Songwriter, Alison Brook
July/August 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series
Gospel Today Spotlight

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Alison Brook
Photo Album Cover: Courtesy of Alison Brook Facebook Music Page

Christian Folk/Pop Singer/Songwriter Alison Brook is an up-and-coming new Christian Artist who, as a minister of the gospel, her first charge is fulfilling the Great Commission. It is Alison’s classical range and eclectic musical taste which lend themselves to her electrified, vulnerable, folk/pop sound. Alison’s recording debut was the song “Jesus Little Lamb,” which the performer cooed out uncannily on pitch in a voice only two years old. We were fortunate  enough to get the opportunity to speak to Alison about her music, her faith, and why it is important for Alison to get her music out to the masses. Here is what transpired from our online encounter.

Isaac: I would like to ask you, for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Alison: Thoughtful, whimsical, folk/pop with a twist.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Alison: Though I risk sounding cheesy: my mom. She is an incredible songwriter. She didn’t do much with her music, but I learned a lot of what I know about writing from her. I especially learned how to craft a thoughtful, meaningful lyric.

Besides mother dearest, I really enjoyed a wide variety of music growing up and in adulthood. All of it, even in small ways, helped shape the type of music I make now.

In my teenage years I listened to a lot of R & B and Rap, as well as a random Gospel album or two. My first couple of CDs I ever purchased were Yolanda Adams, Ma$e, and Destiny’s Child.

Then, when I got to college my tastes started changed and grow. I got into folk, Americana, indie, and even a splash of classical. (I was a voice major in college)!

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Alison: I really enjoy the song “stars.” Not only is it fun to play and sing, but I feel like it’s one of those songs that both soothes the soul and has a bit of energy to it, despite the chill tempo.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Alison: Would it be unfair to name all my friends: Eric & Monique, Matt & Josie Minikus, Lee G, Laura Whidden, and John Millea to name a few.

Other artists I’m loving right now: Regina Spektor, Sara Barillies, The Vespers, Beautiful Eulogy, Propaganda, Ingrid Michaelson, Judah and the Lion.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Alison: I write a lot of my songs when I going through life struggles. Hardship draws the most beautiful songs out of me oddly enough. It’s in the struggles where I grow the most and I am able to have a perspective on life that I wouldn’t have otherwise had.

My favorite part of the writing process is that magical moment when the lyric matches the melody after lots of trial and error. You have this magical first play through the song with those two components work together in perfect unison!

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Alison: Probably Ingrid Michelson or Beautiful Eulogy.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Alison: I’m pretty obsessed with my two dogs, Maddy and Rooney. Whenever I feel annoyed when working on music from home, I go snuggle them real quick for some happiness juice.

I even made them their own Instagram account (le_jerks) so I don’t inundate my friends and fans with millions of dog pictures everyday. I also find no shame in being completely obsessed with them. I fully own it.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Alison: My faith, my dogs, my relationships. Of course those are the obvious ones so maybe that’s not fair. Here are some more superficial answers:

A clean house
Black boots (winter) or flats (summer)
Vintage dresses
Bike rides
Internet

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Alison: I haven’t been in tons of trouble yet. However, I have said many awkward things from stage.
For some reason, I my go-to (unintentional) awkward stage banter very often revolves around poop. I think I have small child humor…

One time I told this whole story about how much my dogs would poop on the floor when they were potty training. I meant for the story to preface and explain a song, but it ended up being more poop-focused than song-focused and I totally lost the moral of the story. I went home super embarrassed, kicking myself for having poop humor.

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Alison: Nope. Well, I can’t say that for sure. I will probably talk about poop again someday. Old habits die hard, ya know?

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Alison: I would probably be a therapist. I find that—because of the nature of my music—many people confide in me after concerts. I also enjoy sharing inspirational messages through music so I would probably enjoy doing something similar through therapy.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Alison: From life, through voice, to heart.

Music is more than entertainment to me, it’s a vehicle that can be used to bring healing, positivity, and encouragement to listeners.

I like using my life experiences and the vehicle of my voice to touch people’s hearts. When I get emails from people telling me that my music has made a positive impact on their lives, this is the thing that gets me through the difficulties of living as an artist. (And we all know there are many!)

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Alison: Wiser.

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Alison: Honestly, it’s been the little moments. The little girls who tell me I’m their role model, or the people who write and tell me what a positive impact my music has had on their lives, those are the moments I live for. I also enjoy the relationships I have been able to build on the road. To me music is all about community. It’s not about me and my stage, it’s about how I can serve others as an artist. Through music I am able to say things that their hearts didn’t know how to say, uttering their darkest secrets and bringing them to light, and showing them hope. I love the little moments when I am able to connect and make a difference.

Official Website:
http://www.alisonbrook.com

The Boogie Bros

 

 

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with Indie Band, The Boogie Bros
July/August 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

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The Boogie Bros
Photo Credit: Liz Driscoll


by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA

We are excited to bring this wonderful interview to our online readers. Indie Band, The Boogie Bros, founding Members Joe Cataldo (vocals, production, custom percussion) and Joe Skahan (vocals, guitar, ukulele) who have been part of the Boogie Bros Project since 2007, are creating great music that certainly has fantastic mass appeal. Currently their line-up includes Chris Stone on Bass, and Jon Morse on Drums, and they are based out of Boston, MA. We were excited to learn more about the band as we picked their brains in this ultra-cool spotlight. Here is their story.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Boogie Bros: Funk, Unique, Cutting edge, eclectic, Rock.

Isaac: What is your musical background? Do you have a musical family or did you just fall into songwriting all on your own?

Joe C: No real musical background or family. I just kind of fell into it as a DJ and House Music Producer.

Joe S: No formal background for me either, or musical family. Got into playing bass guitar in a band in high school and then turned to guitar and pretty much anything else I could get my hands on.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Joe C: Bob Marley, Brad Nole, Beres Hammond.

Joe S: David Bowie, Robert Smith, Joe Strummer.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Joe C: It would probably be Miss Funky Lovely, because it was written from the heart.

Joe S: Definitely Shake to the Rhythm. That song began with me and an acoustic guitar and loop pedal, and turned into what it is today. I loved seeing the whole process of the song and it is tons of fun to play.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Joe C: George Ezra, Milky Chance, Dirty Heads.

Joe S: Tokyo Police Club, The Wombats, Frank Turner, bleachers.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Joe C: Life in General. I don’t forcefully write and allow it all to come to me. The best part is that there are no rules or plans to adhere to.

Joe S: I also focus on life in general and having fun. I agree that there are no rules or plans. We have allowed ourselves to not be classified by any real “genre” So there is no limit to what we can write and present to each other to play in the band. We are limitless to our possibilities. However we have had one key factor in writing music and that is it has to be fun for our fans, music to drink and dance to.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Joe C: The Dirty Heads, they really would fit our style.

Joe S: Right now I would say bleachers, those guys are blowing up right now and would fit well with us.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Joe C: SCUBA Dive.

Joe S: I would say the same. I love being on, in and around the ocean. I also enjoy hanging out with my dog.

Isaac: I can imagine that you have experienced writer’s block from time to time. I imagine this would be particularly annoying if you were in a collaboration situation. If you do, what do you do to get over it?

Joe C: I get over it by going back and listening to some of my favorite records, that I have not heard in while and find inspiration.

Joe S: I never really have a tough time with it. We rely on each other, so even when we are stuck with bits and pieces we always throw it out there to each other and kinda mold that material into some quality stuff. I mean not everything can be saved though some stuff gets tossed right out, while others become great jams.

Isaac: How do you feel about MP3s, Napster and other organizations like them?

Joe C: I mean its whatever, it’s the way of the world. As long as people are listening.

Joe S: I agree to the fact that as long as people are listening it’s great, it’s a job.

Isaac: Do you think online music is playing a large part with respect to where the music industry is heading in the future?

Joe C: Absolutely.

Joe S: Definitely it is the window to a million opportunities.

Isaac: Where do you see songwriters fitting into that equation?

Joe C: Now you can start your own internet universe for free. You can get your music, videos, poetry really anything out there and people will find it.

Joe S: I agree there are so many platforms to put your material online and make it available to anyone in the world. It is a beautiful thing.

Isaac: Do you feel this type of technology is a good thing for Indie Artists or a bad thing?

Joe C: Great thing.

Joe S: Absolutely a great thing. It is FREE!

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Joe C: Love, Family, Music, Art, Food.

Joe S: Family, Music, Art, Pets, Good Beer.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Joe C: Not really much, maybe a heavy bar tab.

Joe S: I agree, we are a pretty humble, friendly group and usually get in good with the clubs that allow us to play and the promoters that put it all together.

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Joe C: Sure.

Joe S: Definitely.

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Joe C: I would be an artist or a professional scuba diver.

Joe S: I would probably be working with animals and education.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Joe C: Treat others the way you want to be treated.

Joe S: Where words fail, music speaks.

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Joe C: Be a Successful Professional Musician

Joe S: Living and healthy.

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Joe C: Probably our performance at the House of Blues Boston. We got to truly experience life as a rock star and perform for a massive amount of people including our families.

Joe S: I agree. That show was the first time my parents ever came to see me perform and it was awesome to see them in the crowd singing the words. Coolest moment ever.

Official Facebook Music Fanpage
https://www.facebook.com/boogiebrosboston

Feeding Fingers

 

 

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with Indie Band, Feeding Fingers
July/August 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

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Feeding Fingers
Photo Courtesy of Feeding Fingers


by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA

We had an interesting conversation with frontman Justin Curfman of the Indie Band, Feeding Fingers. What I found most appealing to our online conservation is the honesty of how Curfman answered each of our questions. The results yielded some great responses that really gets one to dive into the mind of the band and learn more about who they are as artists. Feeding Fingers is made up of a music trio founded by artist Justin Curfman. The band was originally founded in 2006 in Atlanta, Georgia, but later relocated to Germany. We also are a big fan of how the band is able to capture a dark and haunting sound that gives them a special edge above the rest of indie bands currently out in the scene. Check out this recent spotlight and get the 411 on who is Feeding Fingers.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music to explain your sound in 5 words.

Feeding Fingers: That’s a difficult question for me, Isaac. I would hope that our sound changes from album to album. Would a quote from someone else be okay? “Otherworldly, angst-ridden, haunting, darkly romantic…”.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Feeding Fingers: I am not so certain that the word, “iconic” really means anything anymore. I don’t embrace the term and I am always a bit reluctant to answer questions like this because one ultimately ends up painting oneself into a marketing / genre pigeonhole, sometimes intentionally and sometimes not.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Feeding Fingers: With regard to the entire Feeding Fingers discography, I would have to say that the song, “Manufactured Missing Children” from our first album, Wound in Wall would have to be my favorite one to play live. However, some nights the guitars, amplifiers, the magnetic interplay between those things and even the temperature of the room do not sit well with that one, because I play it on guitar with an Ebow – a very wonderful, yet equally unreliable device whose performance varies drastically from night to night. That song can go immediately from being my favorite to my most despised, from rig to rig and gig to gig.

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Justin Curfman of the Indie Band, Feeding Fingers
Photo Courtesy of Feeding Fingers

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Feeding Fingers: As of late, I am finding myself listening most often to Polish microtonal composer, Ivan Alexandrovich Wyschnegradsky, Scott Walker’s The Drift, quite a lot from Mick Karn’s discography, Jeremy Schmidt, Art Bears and Krzysztof Komeda. I have also been listening to a couple of remarkable compilation albums from Trunk Records, one being music written by children titled, Classroom Projects and the other of music written for children by Carl Orff titled, appropriately enough, Music for Children. But, of course, my listening habits change every day, it seems. I also often go through extended periods of time where I am strictly writing and not listening to any music at all.

As far as my telling other people what they should be listening to… I would never do such a thing.

And as far as my belief goes in who deserves the spotlight… I suppose, from a modern, socio-economic standpoint, that the person who deserves the spotlight is whomsoever possesses the ability to do an inverted twerk while balancing a basket of kittens on their ass while doing karaoke at the same time on some network television, amateur talent-show of some sort, sponsored by various fast-food, soft-drink and pharmaceutical companies. I’ll keep working at it. Maybe I’ll get there one day.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Feeding Fingers: I draw inspiration from life experience, dreams, confusion, literature, science… a bit of everything really. I hate to give you such a stock answer, but it’s true. My favorite part about the process is knowing where to put the final brick in a composition. The rest is absolutely terrifying to me.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Feeding Fingers: That’s difficult to say. I am not so easily starstruck. I noticed that James Chance and the Contortions are on tour right now. Pairing with them could make for an interesting evening, maybe.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Feeding Fingers: My first love is stop-motion animation and puppet film-making. Whenever I can step away from music, I generally focus my attention on that little world. I’m also a rather voracious reader and comic-book enthusiast. I hope that I didn’t just make your heart skip a beat with that sexy answer.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Feeding Fingers: Now you are just trying to get me into trouble. I shouldn’t say.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Feeding Fingers: I won’t tell you the most trouble we’ve ever gotten into, of course. But, given your location, I can share a memory with you.

Several years ago, my band played a show in Savannah, Georgia – not too far from where you are based, if I am not mistaken – which was organized by a S&M society. We were the headlining attraction. A small construction crew was hired earlier in the day to build a stage for us inside the venue. Of course, the stage was not fully completed by the time the event began. There was no lighting, aside from a solitary halogen floodlight mounted above and aimed directly at my bass player’s head, certain to roast him alive. No one in the venue could figure out how to turn off the light. As the evening went on and our performance time grew near, my bass player became quite agitated and decided to shut the power off to the entire venue. And so he did, briefly. The promoter then turned the power back on. In protest, my bass player stormed into the venue’s kitchen and stole a roll of aluminum foil. He then stole a ladder from a utility closet. He slammed the ladder upon the stage and climbed it with the aluminum foil clinched between his teeth. Finally, he wrapped the light in aluminum foil, blacking it out, blacking the stage out as well and, in turn, causing the light to melt down and nearly set the building on fire. The audience and promoter were so terrified by us by the time the show began that they had us play, rather than sending us away in handcuffs, despite the possibility of the venue going up in flames at our hands. I found the idea of an entire S&M society being frightened of a trio of skinny musicians to be a bit ironic.

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Feeding Fingers: Yes.

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Feeding Fingers: I would be a retired baseball player by now, of course.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Feeding Fingers: If I were you, I wouldn’t ask me for advice.

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be…

Feeding Fingers: Life has taught me over the course of the past ten years to not even entertain such a thought.

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Feeding Fingers: In 2014, we played our second concert in Warsaw, Poland. It was the first tour of Europe that my current bass player has ever been on with me. To see his eyes suddenly light up with the type of enthusiasm that I had when I first started this band nine years ago after playing to a full house with people singing our songs back to us in an air of positivity so thick that I could almost feel it around me with my eyes closed, made all of the effort that we put into this project worthwhile. Most of the other moments, I choose to keep to myself.

Official Facebook Music Page:
https://www.facebook.com/feedingfingers

Official Band Website:
http://feedingfingers.net/

1974

 

 

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with Indie Band, 1974
July/August 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

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1974
Photo Courtesy of 1974


by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA

There is something nostalgic and beautiful about the sound of 1970’s Rock Music Scene. This next indie band, hailing from Newington, Connecticut, is a 5 piece original rock band that conjures up the magnificent memories and sounds of classic stadium rock bands. Meet 1974 who are awing audiences with powerful guitar driven riffs, Beach Boy-style vocal harmonies, catchy melodies, and high energy stage shows. In this recent spotlight with our publication, we spoke to the members of the band about their music, their sound, musical influences, and other fun facts in this new spotlight. Here is what transpired from our online encounter.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

1974: Riffy, harmonies, rock, energetic, & epic.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

1974: Yes, Rush, Jethro Tull, and The Beatles.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

1974: Abduction.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

1974: Mainstream: Walk The Moon, Jukebox the Ghost. Local: Friend Roulette, Tetramer.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

1974: The members of the band each have their own influences, so while we each create our own individual parts, we pull from those unique influences. Our favorite part is the collaboration; we get together, throw our ideas around, expand on what’s already there and take it out as far as it can go before bringing back in.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

1974: Foo Fighters…

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

1974: Hanging out with friends watching a movie or playing a game (of the video or board variety).

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

1974: Aside from music? Wives/significant others, TV shows, comic books, video games, and good food.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

1974: We’re all pretty clean cut (relatively, that is). No big troubles here, aside from occasional equipment malfunctions.

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

1974: Yes. 100 times again. The five of us are family. We pretty much don’t know life without 1974 or each other at this point.

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

1974: Writing…it has always been about writing great music.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

1974: The music comes first, and everything else follows.

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

1974: Writing the prequel to the sequel of our prequel’s prequel.

Isaac: Brilliant!

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

1974: Headlining the Hartford Rocks Festival at Bushnell Park.

Official Facebook Music Page
https://www.facebook.com/1974online

Fake Furs

 

 

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with Indie Band, Fake Furs
May/June 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Fake Furs playing live at the Troubadou
Photo Credit: Ana Maria Hechanova Manso

We proudly present to our online readers of this Webzine our newest interview. Indie bands come in all shapes and sizes, and each indie band has that something special X-Factor that makes them stand out from the crowd. This can definitely be said with our latest indie band. Meet Fake Furs, a band of filmmakers, who make…music.

Fake Furs’ sound consists of a distillation of intoxicating drum beats and magnificent guitar noise accompanying by strong melodies. We spoke to band members, Sonny Wong (Drums, etc.) and László Bolender (Vocals, etc.) who gave us an insight view of who are the Fake Furs. Here is what transpired from our fantastic online conversation.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Sonny Wong and Laszlo Bolender: Leathery, filthy, hypnotic velvet rock.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Sonny: Kevin Parker (Tame Impala), Wayne Coyne (The Flaming Lips) and Jon Theodore (The Mars Volta).

Laszlo: I’d say Erik Satie, Katie Jane Garside (Queen Adreena) and Josh Homme (Queens of the Stone Age) have probably had the longest-lasting impact on me.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Laszlo: I Want to Hold You By the Bridle holds a special place in my heart.

Sonny: Parable!

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Sonny: I’ve been listening to Tame Impala and the whole Perth psych scene religiously.

Laszlo: I am super hooked on the new Daniel Lanois record, called Flesh and Machine. I really like this artist called Butterclock too. Also, you might want to check out Ghosts in Pocket, they’re amazing live.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Laszlo: It depends; sometimes it’s Sonny and I as we improvise in rehearsals. Sometimes it’s just Sonny or just me, and then we bring in ideas to each other that we work on. As to inspiration — cinematic imagery, literature… it’s hard to say. When we like something, we tend to avoid trying to replicate it, because what would be the point? It’s already been done. The songs always come first though, our ego has no relevance at all. But I think we both agree that our favorite part is when we both look at each other and nod our heads in approval at the same time.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Sonny and Laszlo: The Flaming Lips and Queens of the Stone Age.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Sonny: See and create films. And eat at Señor Fish — it’s a Mexican restaurant by our recording studio in Eagle Rock.

Laszlo: Same. I really like to cook too.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Sonny: My watch, my dog Oscar, car, glasses and the Señor Fish shrimp/scallop burritos.

Laszlo: My cat Bruce Lee Bass, a good pen, Miranda July’s No One Belongs Here More Than You, my glasses too and… yeah, any food item from Señor Fish.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Sonny: We’ve been good little boys.

Laszlo: Yeah, so far, no crazy stories.

Sonny: Except… Just kidding.

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Sonny: I would do again now that knowing what did… wait, what?

Laszlo: Ha-ha-ha (digital laugh).

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Sonny: I’d be shooting more films! ‘Cuz I luuuv it.

Laszlo: I would be doing what I already do; write music for film and build sculptures impossible to sell.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Sonny: “There’s no wrong way to something, as long as it’s right for you.”

Laszlo: “Everything is impossible until somebody does it.”

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Sonny: Teaching my kid to play his first instrument.

Laszlo: I kind of want to study music therapy at some point in my life.

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Laszlo: Seeing people dance to our music is pretty amazing.

Sonny: Hearing people clap after a song. And the burritos after the show.

Official Website:
http://www.thefakefurs.net/

Official Facebook Music Page:
https://www.facebook.com/fakefurs

Whyte Henny

  

 

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with Indie Rapper, Whyte Henny
May/June 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Whyte Henny
Photo Courtesy of London Rowe Management

The Hip-Hop Industry continues to evolve. This statement is definitely true with our next featured artist. Indie Rapper Whyte Henny takes the rap game to new heights with his trap-metal fusion style that is sure to delight Rap and Metal music lovers around the world. It is the fact that Whyte Henny is giving music lovers something different with his rap that resonates the most with our publication. His mastery of his lyrical flows is another aspect that wins big points with this publication. If you are ready for something that is sure to blow you away, then get ready for the music of Indie Rapper Whyte Henny. Here is his amazing story for your reading pleasure.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Whyte Henny: Unique, aggressive, uplifting, organic and new!

Isaac: What is your musical background? Do you have a musical family or did you just fall into songwriting all on your own?

Whyte Henny: My music background is a fusion of who I am inside. I feel like I embody the spirit of metal and hip-hop. I am a fusion of both cultures. I got into music through my grandfather who bought me a guitar at age 5. It’s been no turning back since then.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Whyte Henny: Kid Rock, Limp Biscuit, and Eminem…and believe it or not Bad Boy Entertainment.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Whyte Henny: Right now I have many, some that haven’t been released yet, but “Shut it Down” will always be my favorite. It’s my start!

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Whyte Henny: I like Tove Lo, ILL NiNO, Migos, Meek Mill and a couple of others. When it comes to the spotlight, I have to be biased and say me! We are all participating in a business where the spotlight means everything. So if there is anyone, I’d like to put me in it.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

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Whyte Henny
Photo Courtesy of London Rowe Management

Whyte Henny: Society alone is a major influence. In a fast paced urban environment, anything can happen. Even the cats, cabs and arguments create their own soundtrack and give you inspiration. To sum it all up, life is my greatest influence and inspiration. My process starts with my ideas and my team’s ability to make them come alive.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Whyte Henny: Kid Rock! I am the second coming!!!

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Whyte Henny: I love to skateboard, eat pizza and attend extreme sporting events. I find them to be very relaxing in a weird way.

Isaac: I can imagine that you have experienced writer’s block from time to time. I imagine this would be particularly annoying if you were in a collaboration situation. If you do, what do you do to get over it?

Whyte Henny: Writers block….. Yeah, I think all artists go through that. I personally solve my problem by just taking a car ride and playing new tracks aloud. Sometimes the environment or thoughts that cross my mind help open my thought process.

Isaac: How do you feel about MP3s, Napster and other organizations like them?

Whyte Henny: I wish this was back in the day where fans bought albums and came to in-stores. Those made you feel more connected to the audience. However, technology reaches the masses. So at this point, whatever helps my people connect I’m all for it.

Isaac: Do you think online music is playing a large part with respect to where the music industry is heading in the future?

Whyte Henny: On-line music rules the industry. As I just mentioned, it’s a double edge sword. Things are less personal, but your ability to reach the masses is non comparable.

Isaac: Where do you see songwriters fitting into that equation?

Whyte Henny: Song writers will always be needed. People don’t realize, no matter how good of an artist you are, we all need perspective.

Isaac: Do you feel this type of technology is a good thing for Indie Artists or a bad thing?

Whyte Henny: Indie artist need all the exposure they can get. When you are independent you lack the marketing support of the machine (labels) so the Internet has made it easier for us to compete.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Whyte Henny: 1) Pizza, 2) My guitar, 3) the studio, 4) My family and 5) money (it makes the world go round)!

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Whyte Henny: N/A….. Sorry!

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Whyte Henny: N/A……

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Whyte Henny: IF I wasn’t performing, I would still be in the business somehow. Currently, I am part owner of a major lighting company and we do many major gigs for major clients.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Whyte Henny: Less is more!!!!

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Whyte Henny: Headlining and sponsoring my own tour!!!!

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Whyte Henny: One of my greatest moment s as a performer was touring and performing with a group called H.A.T.E in 2006. We did some great venues and I learned a lot from working with them.

Official Facebook Fan Page:
https://www.facebook.com/whytehenny

Official Website:
http://whytehenny.com/

Daniel Hayes

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Junior’s Cave Health & Sports Interview Exclusive
(Celebrity Interview with Boxer, Mixed Martial Artist, & Men’s Physique Competitor, Daniel Hayes)
May/June 2015 Edition

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Daniel Hayes

Our publication is overjoyed when we’re able to do follow up interviews with exciting talent. We all knew Daniel Hayes initially for his acting abilities then our feature spotlight focused on his multifaceted career as a Boxer, Mixed Martial Artist, and Fitness Model. Today, Daniel is close to reaching his goal of representing his home country of Trinidad and Tobago in the 2016 Olympic Games. We caught up with him so that he can give us the 411 on this newest development and continue to share his inspiring story with our publication.

***Photo Credits For All Photos Used in Interview: Kate Szatmari and Wild Card Boxing Club***

Isaac: Welcome back to Junior’s Cave, Daniel. The last time we interviewed you it was in the summer of 2013. Your last statement was that you were one step closer to making your Olympic dreams come true. How exciting is it for you to be so close to your fulfilling your dreams of being in the Olympics?

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Daniel Hayes (left) & American Rapper Big Sean (right)

Daniel: It’s really exciting. Sometimes I catch myself daydreaming about a few years ago and then I look at my current situation and I say to myself “wow, this is really happening.” I have always been so motivated and driven but that’s kicked into overdrive lately. I wake up everyday knowing as each day passes it’s another day closer.

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Daniel Hayes (left), Actor Scott Caan (middle), & Actor Jerry Ferrara (right)

Isaac: You were recently selected in your home country of Trinidad and Tobago to be on the 2016 Olympic team. How has your home country, family, and friends celebrated you being selected?

Daniel: This has been all been a really cool experience. Everybody has been so supportive, friends, family and especially my mom. There’s no way any of this would have been possible without her. Everyone is really excited for the next steps ahead and I look forward to making them all proud.

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Daniel Hayes (right) & Comedian Dave Chappelle (left)

Isaac: What does this mean for you professionally in your career?

Daniel: Well, this certainly has and will continue to open up a lot of doors for me and will give me a lot more options in the future.

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Daniel Hayes

Isaac: I am also excited to note that you are currently training and fighting out of the world famous Wild Card Boxing Gym in Los Angeles. This gym was made famous by 6 time trainer of the year Freddie Roach and his superstar pupil Manny Pacquiao. What does this mean to you both professionally and personally?

Daniel: Well, professionally it has allowed me to learn from those further down the road and more experienced than me. Everyday I step in there it’s a tremendous learning experience. Personally, I’ve made some pretty cool relationships and l’ve been fortunate enough to be mentored by some of the best in the business.

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Daniel Hayes

Isaac: You stated in your last interview that it is your mom where you find the motivation to do what you do. What are some other people that motivate you to do what you do?

Daniel: Well, now I also represent a country when I fight. So representing them in a world class fashion is always something I look to achieve when stepping into the ring BUT number 1 motivating factor for me is still my mom.

Isaac: We asked the last time did you consider yourself a role model for others to follow. You stated that you wouldn’t say per se you a role model but you always strive to lead by example. Has this answer change any? Do you consider yourself a role model?

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Daniel Hayes (right) & Boxing Legend Mike Tyson (left)

Daniel: Yeah, I would have to say this answer has changed some since the last time. I still always lead by example but I also now understand that regardless I must always set a good example and be a good role model for those that look to me as one.

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Daniel Hayes

Isaac: Have you developed any new philosophy about living life well?

Daniel: I heard this quote a little while back “ The most destructive force in the universe is regret” So, I try to live my life with no regrets each and everyday.

Isaac: Please describe your normal diet. What do you eat in a typical day to stay in the great shape you are in now?

Daniel: Recently, I’ve become a Vegetarian. My nutritionist is the one that convinced me to make the change and it certainly has paid off since.

Isaac: What do you believe is the most challenging part you deal with about consistently staying in top shape?

Daniel: I would say time commitment. I have so much on my plate with acting and now boxing that sometimes it gets difficult to allot the time needed but I make it work.

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Daniel Hayes (left) & Actor Mickey Rourke (right)

Isaac: For those readers who are looking for more information about you and/or your various projects, where can they locate you online?

Daniel: www.daniel-hayes.com

Twitter: @Official_DHayes

Isaac: Finish this sentence for us: “In 2015, Daniel Hayes will be …”

Daniel: “…one year wiser, one year stronger, one year smarter and one year closer to turning dreams into a reality”.

Cary Woodworth

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Junior’s Cave Interview Exclusive
(Celebrity Interview with
Actor/Producer, Cary Woodworth)
May/June 2015 Edition

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American Actor/Producer Cary Woodworth
Photo by Masa Takasuemitsu (www.masatakasuemitsu.com)

American Actor/Producer Cary Woodworth made his film acting debut with the 1999 Indie Film “The Money Shot”. Woodworth quickly began to land parts and in 2004, the talented actor was cast opposite Edison Chen in the British/Chinese film Life. Through the Chinese premiere of the film afforded Woodworth the opportunity to start learning Mandarin, which he now speaks fluently. In 2005, Woodworth had the wonderful opportunity to co-star in a series of Maybelline Commercials with Adriana Lima and Zhang Ziyi which aired worldwide. Today, Woodworth continues to act in great Indie projects that highlight his enormous acting talents. He recently added producing to his credit. Recently, our webzine received the great opportunity to speak with him via online about his amazing career, his upbringing, and other fun facts. Here is our interaction for your reading pleasure.

Isaac: Cary, we want to welcome you to Junior’s Cave. We are well into the year 2015. Has this year started off well for you professionally? What has been one of the standout moments so far in 2015 with your acting career that you would like to let us know about?

Cary: Professionally as an actor, not really. I found out I had contracted mono during a prior shoot and had been out for the first quarter of this year. Just starting to get back to being available and with recovering my energy. I had a few very amazing moments of visualization that were so vivid. This will definitely affect my acting career.

Isaac: I am sorry to hear that. I am happy that you are recovering now.

Isaac: What have been your fondest memories growing up? What makes your hometown special?

Cary: I have many fond memories growing up. A few that stick out are riding my bicycle to get the newest packs of baseball cards, playing soccer with a travel team and having watermelon seed spitting contests with my family. My hometown is a town with a lot of people that commute New York. Many very educated, successful people come from there. When I was a senior, we were listed as the #1 Public High School in the nation.

Isaac: Wow, impressive!

Isaac: At what age did you decide that you wanted to become an actor?

Cary: When I was 12, I pledged to myself. I was scared off in High School but found my way back to it at the end of college.

Isaac: Why do you believe you pursue acting with such deep passion? What is it about acting that fulfills you the most?

Cary: Because I need to. What fulfills me is the experience to live through something else. That game is the best game ever.

Isaac: What do you feel has been your biggest acting achievement professionally for your career so far and why?

Cary: I really don’t know. Projects that people might have recognized me from I don’t really think much of. I haven’t had a Birdman type experience yet in my career that people say Cary is “that guy”. I’ve been fortunate to experience playing many different types of roles, but open to a “that guy” role.

My favorite experience in a play for sure was working on The Dead Boy by Joe Pintauro.

Isaac: Interesting story is that you began to learn the basics of Mandarin, which you currently speak fluently now. Can you elaborate a little about how did this come about?

Cary: I did a film in the UK that had a famous Chinese star in it. For the premieres in China, I traveled to different cities and met an agent on that trip. She wanted to represent me and a year later she negotiated a role in TV series in Southwest China. 90% of my dialogue was in Chinese. It was quite an experience! I ended up doing a film and another series in China a few months later and every day I focused on understanding and communicating with the actors and crew as well as the meaning of what I saying in these scripts. It wasn’t a formal classroom study, was really a life study.

Isaac: Sounds like a great life experience!

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American Actor/Producer Cary Woodworth
Photo Courtesy of Cary Woodworth’s Official Facebook Fan Page

Isaac: Since moving to Los Angeles, do you believe this is the right place for you to help pursue your acting career? Why or why not?

Cary: I actually live in New York go back and forth to LA. I was primarily in LA for several years though. I really don’t think you have to live anywhere specific to have an acting career. But for me, I think it depends on where I am in my journey. I keep finding myself going to LA a lot this past year. It seems to be where I need to be. I can see myself spending most of my next two years there.

Isaac: Have you ever taken a role that you were not passionate about but needed the work?

Cary: Yes. I’ve done quite a few films and TV shows here and there that I was not passionate about. Something I don’t do anymore. But it wasn’t about needing the work. It was because I love to act and want to keep doing it as much as possible while getting paid for it. Most actors will say the same thing. I always try to see the best in the project and REALLY want to believe in it. But it’s not worth it if I’m not going to be proud of it. Really. It burns. And if I think it is crap, I won’t want to put myself fully into it.

Isaac: Something many actors go through in their acting career path.

Isaac: Have you ever worked on a project and once you saw the finished product was unhappy with either the project or your performance in the project?

Cary: Kind of. I’m a very tough audience member, so most things I’m not unhappy with but I’m disappointed or think it could be so much better if this/that. I haven’t watched everything I’ve done. Some films I’ve done I don’t want to see and some I’m fine with watching. I’ve been able to figure out why I don’t want to and it’s always for different reasons. Yes, I was unhappy with my performances in some films. And usually I aim to learn from that. Rarely am I super proud of myself, but my work in a few recent films have passed my very tough meter. And I am proud of it.

Isaac: What would you consider to be the most fun role you ever played, and why?

Cary: I have so much fun with all of them. Honestly, there is not one. But if I think of the ones that make me laugh the most, it would be the roles in the skits that my brother and best friend would create and videotaped when we were teenagers. They were the best.

Isaac: What would you consider to be the hardest role you ever played, and why?

Cary: Hands down the most difficult experience was the last film I did. It was a dance film and I was the lead. But the difficult aspect wasn’t about connecting to the character and environment. The most difficult part was the work environment and a producer that got in the way of their own film.

Isaac: Can you quickly read, understand, and memorize a script? What is your trick for memorizing lines?

Cary: My teacher Suzanne Esper said memorizing lines is so basic. Babies can do it. It’s so not important in the process. People not acting always ask me “how do you learn all those lines”? It’s funny to hear that because memorizing lines doesn’t really weigh in as a specific factor in my process – it’s just part of it. I don’t have a trick…maybe before I become a senior I have to learn one. I just keep reading the script over and over and over and over and over and keep reading through them in my life. It sticks, becomes real eventually. If it doesn’t, there’s something not working for me, I have to work with the writer or director to change it or find a way to connect.

Isaac: When you are looking for a part; what are some of the important attributes that you look for in one of the characters you are going to portray?

Cary: Good question. Most important is that it resonates in me in some way. It doesn’t mean it’s like me or I’ve met someone like this, but this person peaks my curiosity and I want to play in that characters skin. I get this from the dialogue, how the character reacts, and the tone of the script. There’s no specific attribute besides that have life.

Isaac: Do you feel that you can tackle more controversial roles? Are you afraid to portray a character that may not be liked by the general viewing public?

Cary: Yeah. I can. I couldn’t care less how controversial. I care more how they serve. In the play The Dead Boy, I played both a teenage runaway who has an affair with Catholic priest Bruce Ritter of the Covenant House and the younger version of himself, fighting his “demons” in sexual temptation. Literally while in rehearsal, the Boston Diocese had this huge scandal. The world wasn’t ready for this and the Catholic audiences couldn’t take it. In Julia, a feature which comes out this year, I played a disgusting figure who rapes women and enjoys it. I don’t think anyone will like me.

Isaac: If you had an opportunity to work with one director in a film, who would it be and why would you want to work with this director?

Cary: An actor I knew was asked this once at an interview. It was so funny to see his reaction. He got so serious and the interviewer had no idea what he was talking about. But I did. Many actors have dreams to work with specific directors because they admire the work so much. I got to work with this director Jonathan Kaplan who did Project X, Brokedown Palace and a lot of TV. He had done this obscure film in the 70’s that I saw when I was a kid and scared the crap out of me. After we finished working together, I told him my experience and he ended my sentence with the title of the film. He knew. He heard it so many times. But to answer your question…if there was one director that is alive that I’d want to work with it would be David Lynch. I know I’d be in something that is purely sourced from ideas and dreams.

Isaac: Speaking of directors, you have worked behind the camera yourself. What are some directing projects you have involved in that you would like to elaborate more on?

Cary: Yes. I think one day I will direct a lot more. But the most recent film I directed was a short in China called Love Me Like a Rock about a family in a village the raises a baby rock and it grows very quickly. We shot and edited the film in 46 hours with a few hours of sleep in the middle and $1000. I’m very proud of my cast and crew on that. I hope more people see it. We had a screening in China and so many people were touched.

Isaac: With some many comic book movies being made, have you ever wanted to portray a comic book character and if so who would you want to portray in film and why?

Cary: Three. Wolverine, Spiderman, and Groo. I just love those guys!

Isaac: Awesome choices. I especially like your last choice as I am a huge fan of Groo’s comic book series.

Isaac: At the end of the day, what do you want others to take away from your acting performances?

Cary: I truly hope that they touch people to learn about their own lives or discover something new. Or just go somewhere else for a while.

Isaac: Elaborate on some of your current projects that you are working on that you can let our readers know about
Cary: I have been cast as the lead of a very sweet and touching feature film CL28 which is being directed by Dan Thorens and will shoot in the autumn this year. I play Adam Goldman, a young Jewish businessman. I am also in talks to be the lead of another really great feature that hopefully will shoot in the US this year and a few other TV shows and films. Crossing fingers!

Isaac: Fingers crossed.

Isaac: Complete this sentence for us. “2015 will be the year that Cary Woodworth…”

Cary: “..begins to blossom!”.

Official Website:
http://carywoodworth.com/

Official Facebook Fan Page:
https://www.facebook.com/CaryWoodworthFanPage

Ashley Laschelle

 

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with Indie R&B Singer/Songwriter, Ashley Laschelle
April/May 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Ashley Laschelle
Photo Credit: Angie Star of Angie Star Photography

R&B Music comes full circle with the sensational songstress Ashley Laschelle who delivers powerful performances with each note she sings. It is her passion for the popular genre that comes through in her stage performances and in the lyrics she writes. This is why our publication is loving the music of R&B Singer/Songwriter Ashley Laschelle. Are you ready to discover a gem in the music industry? Then look no further. Meet Ashley Laschelle who promises to entertain music lovers from all over the world. Here is her amazing story.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Ashley: Inspirational feel good relatable R&B.

Isaac: What is your musical background? Do you have a musical family or did you just fall into songwriting all on your own?

Ashley: I come from a long line of musicians. My parents sing, my grandparents sing, and so on. I use to make up songs about nature when I was kid as my mother tells it. So it was something that just came natural to me to express myself.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Ashley: Anita Baker, Aretha Franklin, Tamia, Whitney Houston, Stevie Wonder. There are many! But all of the legends I still listen to, to this day. Daily inspirations.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Ashley: I love listening to some of the songs that I wrote like “Fed Up” and “Valley”. Those are the most personal ones to me and I like to listen to the lyrics and production. Also my fave is “I Choose Love” currently. It changes often.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Ashley: Mint Condition, Prince, Jazmine Sullivan, I love to play Innervisions by Stevie Wonder. I also listen to Sarah Marie Young’s Little Candy Heart and Nicole Garza’s ReInvented. Also, Chicago-based rapper D2G has a new EP out called The Seasonal Prequel that’s also a hot project. All available on Soundcloud. Support independent artists!!!

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Ashley: The songs I’ve written thus far are based on things I’ve been through, or those close to me have been through. I like to just sit and talk and pull inspiration from those conversations. That way the process is truly genuine. I never want to just write and not feel attached to anything I’ve written.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Ashley: Hmm, Anita Baker or Brandy, definitely.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Ashley: There’s time outside of that? Lol I like make things, do arts and crafts, and just be creative.

Isaac: I can imagine that you have experienced writer’s block from time to time. I imagine this would be particularly annoying if you were in a collaboration situation. If you do, what do you do to get over it?

Ashley: I have went through it and it’s the worst! I usually try and just imagine the situation I’m to write about and put myself in those shoes and just retrieve from that place.

Isaac: How do you feel about MP3s, Napster and other organizations like them?

Ashley: This generation is all digital, I like them. You never know who is listening to your music or how far it can travel. If I reach one with some lyrics I’ve done a good job.

Isaac: Do you think online music is playing a large part with respect to where the music industry is heading in the future?
Ashley: Yes! Mobility! It’s so quick to google someone and just listen to their whole archive of music versus trying to find a cd player.. lol it’s very convenient.

Isaac: Where do you see songwriters fitting into that equation?

Ashley: It gives the independent artist a great platform to become recognized for their work. It also gives them an outlet to branch out and write for other artists. That’s one of the ways I reached out to a songwriter to collab on a song idea I had.

Isaac: Do you feel this type of technology is a good thing for Indie Artists or a bad thing?

Ashley: It’s a great thing. Do you know how many people across the world can listen to your music without you leaving your home? That’s how the networking process begins. Someone hears about you or listens to your music and may have an event coming up and want you to perform. Then others see you. It’s a great tool for this generation.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Ashley: Phone, iPad, lip gloss, nail polish, and my purse. I’m super girly lol

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Ashley: When I went on tour overseas with a band I was singing with a few years ago, it was hard to find things to eat, I’m super picky I had to challenge myself and try new things. That, and sleeping in a new place every day. Love the comfort of my own bed.

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Ashley: Absolutely! I can’t wait to tour again this time as the main act.

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Ashley: I would probably be a psychologist. I love trying to really understand someone’s perception and how they got there. I’m big on problem solving.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Ashley: “Go hard or go home” Whatever you do, be great at it, not just good. Make them remember you!

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Ashley: Touring, and making music for a living.

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Ashley: Just recently I had a show at Chicago’s Underground Wonder bar and I premiered brand new songs and the crowd of all ages and color enjoyed it! Even bought physical copies of my album. Was the best feeling to know that people were touched by the language of music. That’s what it’s about to me.

Official Website:
http://ashleylaschelle.com/

Official Facebook Music Page:
https://www.facebook.com/AshleyLaschelle84

The Official Blog for Junior's Cave Online Magazine: Where the Indie Culture Comes To Life!