Fake Furs

 

 

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with Indie Band, Fake Furs
May/June 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Fake Furs playing live at the Troubadou
Photo Credit: Ana Maria Hechanova Manso

We proudly present to our online readers of this Webzine our newest interview. Indie bands come in all shapes and sizes, and each indie band has that something special X-Factor that makes them stand out from the crowd. This can definitely be said with our latest indie band. Meet Fake Furs, a band of filmmakers, who make…music.

Fake Furs’ sound consists of a distillation of intoxicating drum beats and magnificent guitar noise accompanying by strong melodies. We spoke to band members, Sonny Wong (Drums, etc.) and László Bolender (Vocals, etc.) who gave us an insight view of who are the Fake Furs. Here is what transpired from our fantastic online conversation.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Sonny Wong and Laszlo Bolender: Leathery, filthy, hypnotic velvet rock.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Sonny: Kevin Parker (Tame Impala), Wayne Coyne (The Flaming Lips) and Jon Theodore (The Mars Volta).

Laszlo: I’d say Erik Satie, Katie Jane Garside (Queen Adreena) and Josh Homme (Queens of the Stone Age) have probably had the longest-lasting impact on me.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Laszlo: I Want to Hold You By the Bridle holds a special place in my heart.

Sonny: Parable!

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Sonny: I’ve been listening to Tame Impala and the whole Perth psych scene religiously.

Laszlo: I am super hooked on the new Daniel Lanois record, called Flesh and Machine. I really like this artist called Butterclock too. Also, you might want to check out Ghosts in Pocket, they’re amazing live.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Laszlo: It depends; sometimes it’s Sonny and I as we improvise in rehearsals. Sometimes it’s just Sonny or just me, and then we bring in ideas to each other that we work on. As to inspiration — cinematic imagery, literature… it’s hard to say. When we like something, we tend to avoid trying to replicate it, because what would be the point? It’s already been done. The songs always come first though, our ego has no relevance at all. But I think we both agree that our favorite part is when we both look at each other and nod our heads in approval at the same time.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Sonny and Laszlo: The Flaming Lips and Queens of the Stone Age.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Sonny: See and create films. And eat at Señor Fish — it’s a Mexican restaurant by our recording studio in Eagle Rock.

Laszlo: Same. I really like to cook too.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Sonny: My watch, my dog Oscar, car, glasses and the Señor Fish shrimp/scallop burritos.

Laszlo: My cat Bruce Lee Bass, a good pen, Miranda July’s No One Belongs Here More Than You, my glasses too and… yeah, any food item from Señor Fish.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Sonny: We’ve been good little boys.

Laszlo: Yeah, so far, no crazy stories.

Sonny: Except… Just kidding.

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Sonny: I would do again now that knowing what did… wait, what?

Laszlo: Ha-ha-ha (digital laugh).

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Sonny: I’d be shooting more films! ‘Cuz I luuuv it.

Laszlo: I would be doing what I already do; write music for film and build sculptures impossible to sell.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Sonny: “There’s no wrong way to something, as long as it’s right for you.”

Laszlo: “Everything is impossible until somebody does it.”

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Sonny: Teaching my kid to play his first instrument.

Laszlo: I kind of want to study music therapy at some point in my life.

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Laszlo: Seeing people dance to our music is pretty amazing.

Sonny: Hearing people clap after a song. And the burritos after the show.

Official Website:
http://www.thefakefurs.net/

Official Facebook Music Page:
https://www.facebook.com/fakefurs

Whyte Henny

  

 

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with Indie Rapper, Whyte Henny
May/June 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Whyte Henny
Photo Courtesy of London Rowe Management

The Hip-Hop Industry continues to evolve. This statement is definitely true with our next featured artist. Indie Rapper Whyte Henny takes the rap game to new heights with his trap-metal fusion style that is sure to delight Rap and Metal music lovers around the world. It is the fact that Whyte Henny is giving music lovers something different with his rap that resonates the most with our publication. His mastery of his lyrical flows is another aspect that wins big points with this publication. If you are ready for something that is sure to blow you away, then get ready for the music of Indie Rapper Whyte Henny. Here is his amazing story for your reading pleasure.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Whyte Henny: Unique, aggressive, uplifting, organic and new!

Isaac: What is your musical background? Do you have a musical family or did you just fall into songwriting all on your own?

Whyte Henny: My music background is a fusion of who I am inside. I feel like I embody the spirit of metal and hip-hop. I am a fusion of both cultures. I got into music through my grandfather who bought me a guitar at age 5. It’s been no turning back since then.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Whyte Henny: Kid Rock, Limp Biscuit, and Eminem…and believe it or not Bad Boy Entertainment.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Whyte Henny: Right now I have many, some that haven’t been released yet, but “Shut it Down” will always be my favorite. It’s my start!

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Whyte Henny: I like Tove Lo, ILL NiNO, Migos, Meek Mill and a couple of others. When it comes to the spotlight, I have to be biased and say me! We are all participating in a business where the spotlight means everything. So if there is anyone, I’d like to put me in it.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

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Whyte Henny
Photo Courtesy of London Rowe Management

Whyte Henny: Society alone is a major influence. In a fast paced urban environment, anything can happen. Even the cats, cabs and arguments create their own soundtrack and give you inspiration. To sum it all up, life is my greatest influence and inspiration. My process starts with my ideas and my team’s ability to make them come alive.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Whyte Henny: Kid Rock! I am the second coming!!!

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Whyte Henny: I love to skateboard, eat pizza and attend extreme sporting events. I find them to be very relaxing in a weird way.

Isaac: I can imagine that you have experienced writer’s block from time to time. I imagine this would be particularly annoying if you were in a collaboration situation. If you do, what do you do to get over it?

Whyte Henny: Writers block….. Yeah, I think all artists go through that. I personally solve my problem by just taking a car ride and playing new tracks aloud. Sometimes the environment or thoughts that cross my mind help open my thought process.

Isaac: How do you feel about MP3s, Napster and other organizations like them?

Whyte Henny: I wish this was back in the day where fans bought albums and came to in-stores. Those made you feel more connected to the audience. However, technology reaches the masses. So at this point, whatever helps my people connect I’m all for it.

Isaac: Do you think online music is playing a large part with respect to where the music industry is heading in the future?

Whyte Henny: On-line music rules the industry. As I just mentioned, it’s a double edge sword. Things are less personal, but your ability to reach the masses is non comparable.

Isaac: Where do you see songwriters fitting into that equation?

Whyte Henny: Song writers will always be needed. People don’t realize, no matter how good of an artist you are, we all need perspective.

Isaac: Do you feel this type of technology is a good thing for Indie Artists or a bad thing?

Whyte Henny: Indie artist need all the exposure they can get. When you are independent you lack the marketing support of the machine (labels) so the Internet has made it easier for us to compete.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Whyte Henny: 1) Pizza, 2) My guitar, 3) the studio, 4) My family and 5) money (it makes the world go round)!

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Whyte Henny: N/A….. Sorry!

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Whyte Henny: N/A……

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Whyte Henny: IF I wasn’t performing, I would still be in the business somehow. Currently, I am part owner of a major lighting company and we do many major gigs for major clients.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Whyte Henny: Less is more!!!!

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Whyte Henny: Headlining and sponsoring my own tour!!!!

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Whyte Henny: One of my greatest moment s as a performer was touring and performing with a group called H.A.T.E in 2006. We did some great venues and I learned a lot from working with them.

Official Facebook Fan Page:
https://www.facebook.com/whytehenny

Official Website:
http://whytehenny.com/

Daniel Hayes

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Junior’s Cave Health & Sports Interview Exclusive
(Celebrity Interview with Boxer, Mixed Martial Artist, & Men’s Physique Competitor, Daniel Hayes)
May/June 2015 Edition

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Daniel Hayes

Our publication is overjoyed when we’re able to do follow up interviews with exciting talent. We all knew Daniel Hayes initially for his acting abilities then our feature spotlight focused on his multifaceted career as a Boxer, Mixed Martial Artist, and Fitness Model. Today, Daniel is close to reaching his goal of representing his home country of Trinidad and Tobago in the 2016 Olympic Games. We caught up with him so that he can give us the 411 on this newest development and continue to share his inspiring story with our publication.

***Photo Credits For All Photos Used in Interview: Kate Szatmari and Wild Card Boxing Club***

Isaac: Welcome back to Junior’s Cave, Daniel. The last time we interviewed you it was in the summer of 2013. Your last statement was that you were one step closer to making your Olympic dreams come true. How exciting is it for you to be so close to your fulfilling your dreams of being in the Olympics?

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Daniel Hayes (left) & American Rapper Big Sean (right)

Daniel: It’s really exciting. Sometimes I catch myself daydreaming about a few years ago and then I look at my current situation and I say to myself “wow, this is really happening.” I have always been so motivated and driven but that’s kicked into overdrive lately. I wake up everyday knowing as each day passes it’s another day closer.

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Daniel Hayes (left), Actor Scott Caan (middle), & Actor Jerry Ferrara (right)

Isaac: You were recently selected in your home country of Trinidad and Tobago to be on the 2016 Olympic team. How has your home country, family, and friends celebrated you being selected?

Daniel: This has been all been a really cool experience. Everybody has been so supportive, friends, family and especially my mom. There’s no way any of this would have been possible without her. Everyone is really excited for the next steps ahead and I look forward to making them all proud.

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Daniel Hayes (right) & Comedian Dave Chappelle (left)

Isaac: What does this mean for you professionally in your career?

Daniel: Well, this certainly has and will continue to open up a lot of doors for me and will give me a lot more options in the future.

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Daniel Hayes

Isaac: I am also excited to note that you are currently training and fighting out of the world famous Wild Card Boxing Gym in Los Angeles. This gym was made famous by 6 time trainer of the year Freddie Roach and his superstar pupil Manny Pacquiao. What does this mean to you both professionally and personally?

Daniel: Well, professionally it has allowed me to learn from those further down the road and more experienced than me. Everyday I step in there it’s a tremendous learning experience. Personally, I’ve made some pretty cool relationships and l’ve been fortunate enough to be mentored by some of the best in the business.

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Daniel Hayes

Isaac: You stated in your last interview that it is your mom where you find the motivation to do what you do. What are some other people that motivate you to do what you do?

Daniel: Well, now I also represent a country when I fight. So representing them in a world class fashion is always something I look to achieve when stepping into the ring BUT number 1 motivating factor for me is still my mom.

Isaac: We asked the last time did you consider yourself a role model for others to follow. You stated that you wouldn’t say per se you a role model but you always strive to lead by example. Has this answer change any? Do you consider yourself a role model?

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Daniel Hayes (right) & Boxing Legend Mike Tyson (left)

Daniel: Yeah, I would have to say this answer has changed some since the last time. I still always lead by example but I also now understand that regardless I must always set a good example and be a good role model for those that look to me as one.

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Daniel Hayes

Isaac: Have you developed any new philosophy about living life well?

Daniel: I heard this quote a little while back “ The most destructive force in the universe is regret” So, I try to live my life with no regrets each and everyday.

Isaac: Please describe your normal diet. What do you eat in a typical day to stay in the great shape you are in now?

Daniel: Recently, I’ve become a Vegetarian. My nutritionist is the one that convinced me to make the change and it certainly has paid off since.

Isaac: What do you believe is the most challenging part you deal with about consistently staying in top shape?

Daniel: I would say time commitment. I have so much on my plate with acting and now boxing that sometimes it gets difficult to allot the time needed but I make it work.

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Daniel Hayes (left) & Actor Mickey Rourke (right)

Isaac: For those readers who are looking for more information about you and/or your various projects, where can they locate you online?

Daniel: www.daniel-hayes.com

Twitter: @Official_DHayes

Isaac: Finish this sentence for us: “In 2015, Daniel Hayes will be …”

Daniel: “…one year wiser, one year stronger, one year smarter and one year closer to turning dreams into a reality”.

Cary Woodworth

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Junior’s Cave Interview Exclusive
(Celebrity Interview with
Actor/Producer, Cary Woodworth)
May/June 2015 Edition

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American Actor/Producer Cary Woodworth
Photo by Masa Takasuemitsu (www.masatakasuemitsu.com)

American Actor/Producer Cary Woodworth made his film acting debut with the 1999 Indie Film “The Money Shot”. Woodworth quickly began to land parts and in 2004, the talented actor was cast opposite Edison Chen in the British/Chinese film Life. Through the Chinese premiere of the film afforded Woodworth the opportunity to start learning Mandarin, which he now speaks fluently. In 2005, Woodworth had the wonderful opportunity to co-star in a series of Maybelline Commercials with Adriana Lima and Zhang Ziyi which aired worldwide. Today, Woodworth continues to act in great Indie projects that highlight his enormous acting talents. He recently added producing to his credit. Recently, our webzine received the great opportunity to speak with him via online about his amazing career, his upbringing, and other fun facts. Here is our interaction for your reading pleasure.

Isaac: Cary, we want to welcome you to Junior’s Cave. We are well into the year 2015. Has this year started off well for you professionally? What has been one of the standout moments so far in 2015 with your acting career that you would like to let us know about?

Cary: Professionally as an actor, not really. I found out I had contracted mono during a prior shoot and had been out for the first quarter of this year. Just starting to get back to being available and with recovering my energy. I had a few very amazing moments of visualization that were so vivid. This will definitely affect my acting career.

Isaac: I am sorry to hear that. I am happy that you are recovering now.

Isaac: What have been your fondest memories growing up? What makes your hometown special?

Cary: I have many fond memories growing up. A few that stick out are riding my bicycle to get the newest packs of baseball cards, playing soccer with a travel team and having watermelon seed spitting contests with my family. My hometown is a town with a lot of people that commute New York. Many very educated, successful people come from there. When I was a senior, we were listed as the #1 Public High School in the nation.

Isaac: Wow, impressive!

Isaac: At what age did you decide that you wanted to become an actor?

Cary: When I was 12, I pledged to myself. I was scared off in High School but found my way back to it at the end of college.

Isaac: Why do you believe you pursue acting with such deep passion? What is it about acting that fulfills you the most?

Cary: Because I need to. What fulfills me is the experience to live through something else. That game is the best game ever.

Isaac: What do you feel has been your biggest acting achievement professionally for your career so far and why?

Cary: I really don’t know. Projects that people might have recognized me from I don’t really think much of. I haven’t had a Birdman type experience yet in my career that people say Cary is “that guy”. I’ve been fortunate to experience playing many different types of roles, but open to a “that guy” role.

My favorite experience in a play for sure was working on The Dead Boy by Joe Pintauro.

Isaac: Interesting story is that you began to learn the basics of Mandarin, which you currently speak fluently now. Can you elaborate a little about how did this come about?

Cary: I did a film in the UK that had a famous Chinese star in it. For the premieres in China, I traveled to different cities and met an agent on that trip. She wanted to represent me and a year later she negotiated a role in TV series in Southwest China. 90% of my dialogue was in Chinese. It was quite an experience! I ended up doing a film and another series in China a few months later and every day I focused on understanding and communicating with the actors and crew as well as the meaning of what I saying in these scripts. It wasn’t a formal classroom study, was really a life study.

Isaac: Sounds like a great life experience!

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American Actor/Producer Cary Woodworth
Photo Courtesy of Cary Woodworth’s Official Facebook Fan Page

Isaac: Since moving to Los Angeles, do you believe this is the right place for you to help pursue your acting career? Why or why not?

Cary: I actually live in New York go back and forth to LA. I was primarily in LA for several years though. I really don’t think you have to live anywhere specific to have an acting career. But for me, I think it depends on where I am in my journey. I keep finding myself going to LA a lot this past year. It seems to be where I need to be. I can see myself spending most of my next two years there.

Isaac: Have you ever taken a role that you were not passionate about but needed the work?

Cary: Yes. I’ve done quite a few films and TV shows here and there that I was not passionate about. Something I don’t do anymore. But it wasn’t about needing the work. It was because I love to act and want to keep doing it as much as possible while getting paid for it. Most actors will say the same thing. I always try to see the best in the project and REALLY want to believe in it. But it’s not worth it if I’m not going to be proud of it. Really. It burns. And if I think it is crap, I won’t want to put myself fully into it.

Isaac: Something many actors go through in their acting career path.

Isaac: Have you ever worked on a project and once you saw the finished product was unhappy with either the project or your performance in the project?

Cary: Kind of. I’m a very tough audience member, so most things I’m not unhappy with but I’m disappointed or think it could be so much better if this/that. I haven’t watched everything I’ve done. Some films I’ve done I don’t want to see and some I’m fine with watching. I’ve been able to figure out why I don’t want to and it’s always for different reasons. Yes, I was unhappy with my performances in some films. And usually I aim to learn from that. Rarely am I super proud of myself, but my work in a few recent films have passed my very tough meter. And I am proud of it.

Isaac: What would you consider to be the most fun role you ever played, and why?

Cary: I have so much fun with all of them. Honestly, there is not one. But if I think of the ones that make me laugh the most, it would be the roles in the skits that my brother and best friend would create and videotaped when we were teenagers. They were the best.

Isaac: What would you consider to be the hardest role you ever played, and why?

Cary: Hands down the most difficult experience was the last film I did. It was a dance film and I was the lead. But the difficult aspect wasn’t about connecting to the character and environment. The most difficult part was the work environment and a producer that got in the way of their own film.

Isaac: Can you quickly read, understand, and memorize a script? What is your trick for memorizing lines?

Cary: My teacher Suzanne Esper said memorizing lines is so basic. Babies can do it. It’s so not important in the process. People not acting always ask me “how do you learn all those lines”? It’s funny to hear that because memorizing lines doesn’t really weigh in as a specific factor in my process – it’s just part of it. I don’t have a trick…maybe before I become a senior I have to learn one. I just keep reading the script over and over and over and over and over and keep reading through them in my life. It sticks, becomes real eventually. If it doesn’t, there’s something not working for me, I have to work with the writer or director to change it or find a way to connect.

Isaac: When you are looking for a part; what are some of the important attributes that you look for in one of the characters you are going to portray?

Cary: Good question. Most important is that it resonates in me in some way. It doesn’t mean it’s like me or I’ve met someone like this, but this person peaks my curiosity and I want to play in that characters skin. I get this from the dialogue, how the character reacts, and the tone of the script. There’s no specific attribute besides that have life.

Isaac: Do you feel that you can tackle more controversial roles? Are you afraid to portray a character that may not be liked by the general viewing public?

Cary: Yeah. I can. I couldn’t care less how controversial. I care more how they serve. In the play The Dead Boy, I played both a teenage runaway who has an affair with Catholic priest Bruce Ritter of the Covenant House and the younger version of himself, fighting his “demons” in sexual temptation. Literally while in rehearsal, the Boston Diocese had this huge scandal. The world wasn’t ready for this and the Catholic audiences couldn’t take it. In Julia, a feature which comes out this year, I played a disgusting figure who rapes women and enjoys it. I don’t think anyone will like me.

Isaac: If you had an opportunity to work with one director in a film, who would it be and why would you want to work with this director?

Cary: An actor I knew was asked this once at an interview. It was so funny to see his reaction. He got so serious and the interviewer had no idea what he was talking about. But I did. Many actors have dreams to work with specific directors because they admire the work so much. I got to work with this director Jonathan Kaplan who did Project X, Brokedown Palace and a lot of TV. He had done this obscure film in the 70’s that I saw when I was a kid and scared the crap out of me. After we finished working together, I told him my experience and he ended my sentence with the title of the film. He knew. He heard it so many times. But to answer your question…if there was one director that is alive that I’d want to work with it would be David Lynch. I know I’d be in something that is purely sourced from ideas and dreams.

Isaac: Speaking of directors, you have worked behind the camera yourself. What are some directing projects you have involved in that you would like to elaborate more on?

Cary: Yes. I think one day I will direct a lot more. But the most recent film I directed was a short in China called Love Me Like a Rock about a family in a village the raises a baby rock and it grows very quickly. We shot and edited the film in 46 hours with a few hours of sleep in the middle and $1000. I’m very proud of my cast and crew on that. I hope more people see it. We had a screening in China and so many people were touched.

Isaac: With some many comic book movies being made, have you ever wanted to portray a comic book character and if so who would you want to portray in film and why?

Cary: Three. Wolverine, Spiderman, and Groo. I just love those guys!

Isaac: Awesome choices. I especially like your last choice as I am a huge fan of Groo’s comic book series.

Isaac: At the end of the day, what do you want others to take away from your acting performances?

Cary: I truly hope that they touch people to learn about their own lives or discover something new. Or just go somewhere else for a while.

Isaac: Elaborate on some of your current projects that you are working on that you can let our readers know about
Cary: I have been cast as the lead of a very sweet and touching feature film CL28 which is being directed by Dan Thorens and will shoot in the autumn this year. I play Adam Goldman, a young Jewish businessman. I am also in talks to be the lead of another really great feature that hopefully will shoot in the US this year and a few other TV shows and films. Crossing fingers!

Isaac: Fingers crossed.

Isaac: Complete this sentence for us. “2015 will be the year that Cary Woodworth…”

Cary: “..begins to blossom!”.

Official Website:
http://carywoodworth.com/

Official Facebook Fan Page:
https://www.facebook.com/CaryWoodworthFanPage

Ashley Laschelle

 

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with Indie R&B Singer/Songwriter, Ashley Laschelle
April/May 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Ashley Laschelle
Photo Credit: Angie Star of Angie Star Photography

R&B Music comes full circle with the sensational songstress Ashley Laschelle who delivers powerful performances with each note she sings. It is her passion for the popular genre that comes through in her stage performances and in the lyrics she writes. This is why our publication is loving the music of R&B Singer/Songwriter Ashley Laschelle. Are you ready to discover a gem in the music industry? Then look no further. Meet Ashley Laschelle who promises to entertain music lovers from all over the world. Here is her amazing story.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Ashley: Inspirational feel good relatable R&B.

Isaac: What is your musical background? Do you have a musical family or did you just fall into songwriting all on your own?

Ashley: I come from a long line of musicians. My parents sing, my grandparents sing, and so on. I use to make up songs about nature when I was kid as my mother tells it. So it was something that just came natural to me to express myself.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Ashley: Anita Baker, Aretha Franklin, Tamia, Whitney Houston, Stevie Wonder. There are many! But all of the legends I still listen to, to this day. Daily inspirations.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Ashley: I love listening to some of the songs that I wrote like “Fed Up” and “Valley”. Those are the most personal ones to me and I like to listen to the lyrics and production. Also my fave is “I Choose Love” currently. It changes often.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Ashley: Mint Condition, Prince, Jazmine Sullivan, I love to play Innervisions by Stevie Wonder. I also listen to Sarah Marie Young’s Little Candy Heart and Nicole Garza’s ReInvented. Also, Chicago-based rapper D2G has a new EP out called The Seasonal Prequel that’s also a hot project. All available on Soundcloud. Support independent artists!!!

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Ashley: The songs I’ve written thus far are based on things I’ve been through, or those close to me have been through. I like to just sit and talk and pull inspiration from those conversations. That way the process is truly genuine. I never want to just write and not feel attached to anything I’ve written.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Ashley: Hmm, Anita Baker or Brandy, definitely.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Ashley: There’s time outside of that? Lol I like make things, do arts and crafts, and just be creative.

Isaac: I can imagine that you have experienced writer’s block from time to time. I imagine this would be particularly annoying if you were in a collaboration situation. If you do, what do you do to get over it?

Ashley: I have went through it and it’s the worst! I usually try and just imagine the situation I’m to write about and put myself in those shoes and just retrieve from that place.

Isaac: How do you feel about MP3s, Napster and other organizations like them?

Ashley: This generation is all digital, I like them. You never know who is listening to your music or how far it can travel. If I reach one with some lyrics I’ve done a good job.

Isaac: Do you think online music is playing a large part with respect to where the music industry is heading in the future?
Ashley: Yes! Mobility! It’s so quick to google someone and just listen to their whole archive of music versus trying to find a cd player.. lol it’s very convenient.

Isaac: Where do you see songwriters fitting into that equation?

Ashley: It gives the independent artist a great platform to become recognized for their work. It also gives them an outlet to branch out and write for other artists. That’s one of the ways I reached out to a songwriter to collab on a song idea I had.

Isaac: Do you feel this type of technology is a good thing for Indie Artists or a bad thing?

Ashley: It’s a great thing. Do you know how many people across the world can listen to your music without you leaving your home? That’s how the networking process begins. Someone hears about you or listens to your music and may have an event coming up and want you to perform. Then others see you. It’s a great tool for this generation.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Ashley: Phone, iPad, lip gloss, nail polish, and my purse. I’m super girly lol

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Ashley: When I went on tour overseas with a band I was singing with a few years ago, it was hard to find things to eat, I’m super picky I had to challenge myself and try new things. That, and sleeping in a new place every day. Love the comfort of my own bed.

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Ashley: Absolutely! I can’t wait to tour again this time as the main act.

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Ashley: I would probably be a psychologist. I love trying to really understand someone’s perception and how they got there. I’m big on problem solving.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Ashley: “Go hard or go home” Whatever you do, be great at it, not just good. Make them remember you!

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Ashley: Touring, and making music for a living.

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Ashley: Just recently I had a show at Chicago’s Underground Wonder bar and I premiered brand new songs and the crowd of all ages and color enjoyed it! Even bought physical copies of my album. Was the best feeling to know that people were touched by the language of music. That’s what it’s about to me.

Official Website:
http://ashleylaschelle.com/

Official Facebook Music Page:
https://www.facebook.com/AshleyLaschelle84

Robert Cody Maxwell and The Gentlemen Vain

 

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with Indie Folk/Rock/Americana/Alt-Country Band, Robert Cody Maxwell and The Gentlemen Vain
March/April 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Robert Maxwell of Robert Cody Maxwell and The Gentlemen Vain
Photo Credit: The Netted Pigeon (Michael Hernandez)

Robert Maxwell, Daniel Villanueva, Clemente Gomez, and David Snawder are collectively known as the Indie Folk/Rock/Americana/ Alt-Country Band Robert Cody Maxwell and The Gentlemen Vain. The indie band’s abilities to capture perfect moments of life lessons through great storytelling and create an impressively picturesque sound are some of the strong points to the success of their music. The other part to the band’s magic comes from their fusion of different genes into a winning sound that will certainly resonate with music lovers around the world. In this spotlight with our publication, we get the 411 on who is Robert Cody Maxwell and The Gentlemen Vain.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Maxwell: Enthusiastic unaffected American folk rock.

Isaac: Great response.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Maxwell: There are always, and I think it’s like this for everyone, but there are always way too many to name. I keep going back to Bruce Springsteen and Jackson Browne records. “Emotionalism” by The Avett Brothers had a huge impact on my life and really changed the way I thought and set me on the path I’ve been on since I heard it. There’s an enthusiasm that runs through all of those bands, as writers and as performers, that is inescapable and welcoming, and I am always drawn to that.

Isaac: All of them are great iconic artists.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Maxwell: We’ve been playing the title track from the EP, “Victory” and that one is always a lot of fun because as we play it live it builds and gets a lot louder and dirtier than the recording. There’s a new piano song called “Move On” that hasn’t been recorded yet and it alternates between a kind of ballad and a jangly mess with a lot of dynamics, so that’s becoming one of my favorites too.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Maxwell: I’ve been listening to a lot of local musicians lately. I used to live in Denton, TX and there are some really unbelievable bands there. I went on a tour last summer with Jesse Thompson who has a band there called Levi Cobb and The Big Smoke. Their last album, “Troublemaker” was recorded at Redwood Studios and is some of the best Americana writing you can find in the state. Another Denton songwriter, Daniel Markham, has been getting a lot of well-deserved press for his last album and he knows how to turn a phrase. If you haven’t heard “Pretty Bitchin” you’ve got to go listen to it – the name sums it up. Here in Dallas there’s an incredible band called Bethan, whose music is one that defies description. You just have to go find their record “Time Gone By.” A friend of mine recently recommended Phosphorescent’s album “To Willie” and I’ve been listening to it non-stop. It’s a collection of Willie Nelson covers and it has to be heard to be believed. I’ve also been listening to Middle Brother and Blake Mills a lot lately.

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Maxwell: Oh man. There’s never an easy answer to this. Everything comes in so many ways, and it’s constantly coming in. Our guitarist and long-time friend has a film project called takenfromtheair and we have talked before about how we kind of feel like there are all of these ideas, or maybe songs to be written, that are just floating around like radio waves waiting for someone to just take them from the air and make them visible to other people. My favorite part of the process is definitely coffee, because it’s the only part that’s remotely consistent.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Maxwell: If we’re imagining a world in which I can just snap my fingers and go on tour with anyone, I would really love the chance to be side-stage with a band like Dawes. I think there’s a lot to be learned from those guys as a band and Taylor Goldsmith in particular as a songwriter. Or Langhorne Slim and The Law. They’ve been favorites for a long time and they’re incredible.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/playing etc?

Maxwell: I love making quick trips down to Austin and up to Denton to get out of town and see what’s going on. Those towns always have something great going on and it’s good to see what’s happening. That and taking walks.

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Robert Maxwell of Robert Cody Maxwell and The Gentlemen Vain
Photo Credit: Clemente Gomez

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Maxwell: My girlfriend, barbacoa tacos, a capo, my hat, and Merle Haggard songs.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Maxwell: We almost had a nasty run in with the law in Virginia. And by law, I mean natural law. We were driving through the Blue Ridge Mountains from a gig in North Carolina to another one in Washington, DC and we knew we were going to camp there in the mountains for the night. We had been joking all day about getting eaten by bears and we ended up having to stop right in front of a mother bear and two cubs and let them cross the road. It was kind of beautiful until we realized that we were sleeping just a ways down the road. So we tried to hide all of our food and scrub any food smell off of ourselves, and all slept in one tent and kept waking up pretty sure we were going to be bear food. We’re still here though so apparently bears do not find us particularly attractive.

Isaac: That is very great story. I would had been scared sh#tless myself. Ha.

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Maxwell: Absolutely. Next time I’m going to bring a picnic basket.

Isaac: :-)

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Maxwell: I’d probably be a writer, but there’s nothing I’d rather be doing than performing.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Maxwell: Decide what to be and go be it.

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Maxwell: Older and wiser. I would love to live in Asheville, North Carolina at some point in the future, but probably California at some point before that.

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Maxwell: I think probably my favorite moments have come from house shows. We put on a bunch of house shows in Denton last year and there’s a kind of magic that happens when everyone is standing in really close proximity and they’re singing the music that you’re playing them and jumping up and down and sweating and dancing. It feels like that’s how live music is supposed to feel and it feels very welcoming and warm.

Official Website:
http://www.thegentlemenvain.com/

Official Facebook Band Page:
https://www.facebook.com/rcmaxwellandthegentlemenvain

Kolas

 

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with Indie Singer/Songwriter, Kolas
March/April 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Kolas
Photo Credit: Laurence Labat

We are excited to bring to the online pages of Junior’s Cave Online Magazine the music of Kolas who is a singer/songwriter who blends Folk and Blues into a harmonious combination. Kolas is a one man band who uses as his principal instrument a hand crafted Dobro by Gilles Lacombe and a Cajon that the talented artist built himself. It is his compositions of between Folk and Blues that resonate with this online publication. Kolas has a talent of singing about deep emotions which gives his music that special authenticity. Here is a recent interview with Kolas that explores and reveals the man behind the music, his musical influences, and where he sees himself in the music industry 10 years from now.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Kolas: A raw and honest blues.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Kolas: To begin with, Johnny Cash. For the honesty of his soul and music. A lot of names come to mind… Jeff Buckley for his heart and his voice, Eddie Vedder for his words and his voice. Lately, it’s mostly been Ben Howard, his music just speaks the truth and he stays true to himself, I admire that. And of course John Butler Trio, Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones, John Lee Hooker and so many others…

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Kolas: I would say Song About a Road Trip, because it reminds me of a time where I learned a lot about my mistakes. A lot of challenges came across my path, and this song helps me keep in mind that we all grow in our own way, and that we don’t have to be afraid of change.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Kolas: Ben Howard’s latest album – I Forget Where We Were – has been playing over and over for 2 months now. It’s a really mature record, and has a lot of beautiful inspiring tones. Shakey Graves is also one of the artists I listen to the most theses times. His first album Roll The Bones and all the videos on YouTube featuring him are just awesome, great artist. And also Charlie Winston, who just released a new album. This artist is the bomb, all his albums are different universes, always reinventing himself, and he is a must.

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Kolas
Photo Courtesy of Kolas

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Kolas: Most of the time, the writing comes when I feel something profound. I try to write it down in the truest form. For example, the song Presence off my debut EP explains a feeling I had over and over again for a year. And throughout the song I paint moments of when I felt that feeling, and what it did to me. As though this is the most frequent type of moments that inspires me, it can also be triggered by a book, a movie, a thought, an article, a picture – pretty much anything that can generate an emotion. My favorite part would be the writing itself. Because it is always different. Sometimes I take my time to put my ideas and feelings into words, but it can also be in an urge and I try to find something to write on the fastest way possible. The moment where the words hit you is the most unpredictable, honest and enjoyable one.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Kolas: Ben Howard, without hesitation.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Kolas: Haha it depends of the season. In summer it would be to go outside, ride my motorcycle, do some slackline, yoga, bike, etc. But a four season activity: go to the movies, buy a popcorn and just sit there in the dark and space out into another universe.

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Kolas
Photo Courtesy of Kolas

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Kolas: My girlfriend haha, cheesy I know… the sun, food, movies, travel.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Kolas: In one of my last shows in Montreal, the technical problems just kept piling on. It began with my Simon & Patrick acoustic guitar. During the sound check, the pickup battery died. So in a rush, I ran to the closest store where I could buy a new one and that was still open. Fortunately, there was one two blocks away. Then, in the first act of the show, where I played solo, one of my strings happened to break at the second song… Which is a common thing, but still, it had to happen at the beginning… Then later on, in the second part of the show, when I took out my Simon & Patrick guitar, it started distorting for an unknown reason to a point where I couldn’t use it anymore. So I had to cut my set short of four songs. I was so mad haha. But you know, things happen, and the show must go on.

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Kolas
Album Cover

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Kolas: Absolutely, because I learned how to manage those kinds of obstacles that can always present themselves along the way.

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Kolas: There are multiple things I’d like to try out. I would love to be an outdoor guide. I love being outside into the nature and love to have a contact with people. But I’ve always wanted to be an actor, theater has been a great part of my life during my teenage days. Also I find myself attracted to film music. I would enjoy to record tracks especially for movies. Like Arcade Fire did for the movie Her.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Kolas: Live free, do what makes you happy, seek happiness. But still think long term and work hard to achieve your goals.

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Kolas: I will be making music full time, I will have achieved my current goals, and working on my next projects!

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Kolas: My greatest moment was when I first felt the connection between the public and my music. It was while playing in duo with my drummer, our bassist couldn’t make it so we improvised without him. It was so unpredictable and fun, we had a blast and the crowd had such a great reaction. That’s when I learned how to fully get myself in my music while performing, without minding what the rest of the world thought. I think that’s when you reach the most honest performance, and the public can feel it. A chemistry is then created.

Official Facebook Page:
https://www.facebook.com/Kolasmusic

Official Website:
http://www.kolasmusic.com

Colin Rivera

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Junior’s Cave Interview Exclusive
(Celebrity Interview with
Producer/Director, Colin Rivera)
March/April 2015 Edition

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The Cast from The End of Something
Photo Courtesy of Producer/Director Colin Rivera

Producer/Director Colin Rivera of the full length indie film, The End of Something, takes us to world where a small black box theater group in Brooklyn is struggling to survive in the face of urban and economic development. The film also explores endings and several different themes of endings are magnificently and brilliantly portrayed by a group of super talented actors/actresses. It is the combination of Rivera’s superb direction and the ensemble cast’s outstanding acting abilities that make this a great film. We spoke to Rivera about his amazing film, and he was more than happy to share some wonderful insights on the making of the film and what others can expect to learn after watching this masterpiece. Here is the full interview in its entirety. Enjoy!

Isaac: Colin, I want to welcome you to Junior’s Cave. I also wanted to thank you so much for allowing me to have an opportunity to interview you and discuss your indie film, The End of Something.

Colin: Thanks for having me, Isaac.

Isaac: You produced and directed this film. What was one of the benefits of being able to produce the film you were directing?

Colin: Fewer arguments about budget and casting decisions.

Isaac: How hard is it for you to wear so many hats with regards to making sure that you stay on task with getting your film completed successfully?

Colin: In addition to producing and directing, I also wrote, filmed and edited the film (under pseudonyms.) The DIY model of filmmaking is inherently conducive to getting something finished, since there are fewer points of process breakdowns. It also means you spend an awful lot of time on all pre‐ and post-production stuff. At the end of the day, you know that if it fails, you have no one to blame but yourself, so there’s your motivation for finishing.

Isaac: The End of Something is about a small black box theater group in Brooklyn struggling to survive in the face of urban and economic development. What was the inspiration on making this film? Can you elaborate a little about the background story of the film as to why you decided to use this theme for the film?

Colin: I know and have worked with many young actors who come out of schools and colleges eager to act and share their talents with the world, only to find opportunities few and far between. Many of them end up forming their own small theater companies and renting out holes in the wall to put on shows that are sparsely attended. If you’re a supportive friend of a young actor, you’ve at some point sat in an audience smaller than the cast. It’s tough and disheartening, and they don’t tend to last long, but there’s always another wave of young actors to take up where others leave off. It’s very similar to kids coming out of film school, wanting to make their own films and forming their own production companies. The big difference between the two though is films can live forever (for better or worse) online, whereas theater productions have a handful of showings and are gone forever. So, what better way to celebrate the etherealness of a doomed theater group that through film?

The other theme of the film is of endings ‐ the endings of relationships, partnerships, friendships, dreams. In your early twenties, you have your future ahead of you and still have wide‐eyed optimism of where you’ll go and what you’ll do. Right before the thirties hit (which is where the characters are in the film) you’re hit with a panic that you haven’t done something yet or aren’t ever going to get there, so that’s the natural life‐course correction period. Hence, the end of something, but the start of something else.

Isaac: I can imagine that there are some intense moments in the film. What has been the reactions from critics and peers you have received about the film?

Colin: I was incredibly lucky to have worked with an outstanding cast, especially Sarah‐Doe Osborne who won the Best Actress award at the NYC Independent Film Festival and Cuyle Carvin, who agreed to grow facial hair and dress like a shlub and is absolutely the heart of the film. We were nominated for Best Ensemble Cast at Bare Bones Int’l Film Festival, as well as Best Comedy Feature. I was nominated for Auteur of the Year there as well, and won Best Director at NYC Indie Film Fest.

Isaac: Big CONGRATS on all the wonderful deserved recognition the film, its cast, and you are receiving.

Isaac: What do you want others to take away from the film after watching it?

Colin: Hire/cast these actors for your production, because you’ve just seen how awesome they are.

Isaac: Are you happy with the end results of this amazing film? Is there anything you would change or do differently if you had the opportunity?

Colin: Again, amazing cast and performances. Outstanding music contributions from The West Fjords, The Jack Lords Orchestra, and most of all Dyka and Paulo, whose score really gives the film its vibe. More time and more money would help immensely with production values. I shot the film right around that time when DSLR video was just emerging so I bought a contraption to put over my 2006 Panasonic HVX‐200 to emulate shallow depth of field. I saved a ton of money and time not going RED, but in 2015 unfortunately the iPhone has better quality video. My budget was $5k, most of which went to location rentals, by the way.

Isaac: Where can others check this film out at?

Colin: You can get it at Amazon Instant Video (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00U4XBB56/), in HD on
Vimeo on Demand (https://vimeo.com/ondemand/teos) and on Reelhouse
(https://www.reelhouse.org/vintageyouthfilms/the‐end‐of‐something). For more info, check out the website at http://theendofsomethingfilm.com

Isaac: What’s next for you?

Colin: I’ve been working on a web series that eventually will see the light of day. Hopefully working with some of these fine actors again.

Isaac: Finish this sentence….. “The End of Something is the film that will…..

Colin: “…show you what Cuyle Carvin, Sarah‐Doe Osborne, James Liebman, Angela Relucio, Stacey Napoleone, Hakim McMillan, Ryan G. Metzger, Elise Rovinsky, Adam Shorsten and Naomi Warner can really do if given the material and opportunity. Thanks again for the time, Isaac, and good luck”.

Teaser Trailer for The End of Something

Official Trailer for The End of Something

Soul Track Mind

 

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with Indie Soul/Funk/Rock Band, Soul Track Mind
March/April 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series

 

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
 photo Soul Track Mind 1-photo by Marco Gutierrez_zpsm3c72lil.jpg
Soul Track Mind
Photo by Marco Gutierrez

It takes a special gifted and talented band to be able to blend perfectly different genres into a winning sound. Indie Band Soul Track Mind certainly accomplish this with their music. The group is able to mix Soul, Funk, and Rock laced over elements of R&B, Blues, and Jazz. One of the best parts to the band’s appeal is the strong male voice of lead man Donovan Keith. His voice fits perfectly with the band’s music and the array of wonderful sounds that will get music lovers up and out of their seats hitting the dance floor. In this recent spotlight with our publication, we spoke to the members of Soul Track Mind about their quest to bring their music to the masses. Here is what developed from that sensational online encounter with Soul Track Mind.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Soul Track Mind: High-energy, Passionate Rock N’ Soul.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Soul Track Mind: Sam Cooke, Stax Records, Stevie Wonder, Led Zeppelin, Beatles, and Rolling Stones. There are many more, but we’ll collectively draw from older music.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Soul Track Mind: Ode To Youth.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Soul Track Mind: Aloe Blacc, The Monophonics, Ben L’Oncle, & D’Angelo’s new album.

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Soul Track Mind
Photo by Marco Gutierrez

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Soul Track Mind: We want you to feel when you hear our music and see our live show. It’s not about dancing & feeling good or lyrics with vague meaningless imagery for the sake of being poetic. It’s much more specific than that. We draw inspiration from our own humanity and we try to spin it in a way that everyone can relate to because our songs are based on emotions that everyone feels. Making that emotional connection with our audience, either live or in the studio with our music is what makes our band unique.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Soul Track Mind: We’re not picky. Aloe Blacc, Bruno Mars, even Taylor Swift, we don’t care. We’ll open for any major artist, any genre, anytime, anywhere. It doesn’t matter who it is, but they better bring their “A” game because we’ll give them a run for their money.

Isaac: :-)

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Soul Track Mind: Everyone in the band has different hobbies and interests. For example, our Front-man & Singer Donovan Keith plays soccer and does Swing Dancing as a hobby. Our guitarist Jonathon Zemek likes to shoot guns and is a chicken wing aficionado.

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Soul Track Mind:

1.) iPhone. How did people live without these things?
2.) Sweet Tea
3.) The city of Austin, TX
4.) BBQ
5.) Bucee’s. If you don’t know what that is, you need to find out and go there. Seriously.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

We were playing a show in Illinois a few years back on tour and our singer knocked a girl’s tooth out at a bar. It was purely on accident. The band was hanging out watching the band playing after us. It was a small club and the dance floor was right near the bar. He was dancing with a girl and when he tried to spin her around his hand accidentally hit the pint glass of a girl who was drinking from it and it knocked her tooth out apparently. It was so loud and dark in the room that nobody knew what happened until we all went out to our van and her friends were cussing us out and trying to start a fight.

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Soul Track Mind: Performing is life. If you leave yourself a fall back plan then you’ll fall back on it. If you don’t then you have no choice but to move forward. There is nothing else like it.

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Soul Track Mind: Let experience be your teacher and never let anybody try to tell you who you are and what’s best for you.

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be…
Soul Track Mind: Playing the Super Bowl.

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Soul Track Mind: One time we were playing SXSW in Austin, TX. We were sandwiched between nothing but hard rock and heavy metal bands. We only played a 30 min set and the audience was full of fans of their genre at this showcase. We interrupted their Rock & Metal event and gave them some Soul and we completely stole the show. One of the drummers in another band came up to us after we slayed the entire house. He runs up with his hair in massive colored spikes, full heavy metal attire, and he said, “I’m from NY, I’m a metalhead and don’t know anything about this music. That was F’ing awesome. I’ve never danced in my entire life to any band ever. You guys made me dance.” This is just another example of how our band has been able to play all different venues for different audiences, age groups, etc. Our music has universal appeal and we try to connect to everyone.

The Band’s Official Website:
http://www.soultrackmind.com/

Heather Stanley

 

Junior’s Cave
Music Interview
with Christian Pop Singer/Songwriter, Heather Stanley
March/April 2015 Edition
Sonicbids Weekly Music Series
Gospel Today Spotlight

by Isaac Davis Junior, BGS, MBA
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Heather Stanley
Photo Courtesy of Michael Miller with Cowlick Creation

Christian Pop Singer/Songwriter Heather Stanley is an up-and-coming new Christian Artist who is continuing the wonderful tradition of the many great Contemporary Christian Artists before her. She is delivering solid performances with her beautiful voice, uplifting and inspiring lyrics, and catchy hooks all aimed at being a great role model for Christians around the world. It was a pleasure getting to know more about the multi-talented artist, learning more about her strong faith, her musical influences, and where she sees herself in 10 years. After reading this spotlight, our publication knows others will find her just as appealing as we do. Here is her amazing story for our online readers’ enjoyment.

Isaac: I would like to ask you for the readers of this online publication who have never heard your music, explain your sound in 5 words:

Heather Stanley: Upbeat, Inspiring, Fun, Happy, and Versatile.

Isaac: With respect to musical icons, who would you consider to be your most significant musical influences?

Heather Stanley: Stacie Orrico, Switchfoot, and Tobymac.

Isaac: Do you have a favorite song to play from your collection so far?

Heather Stanley: Yes. “Beautiful”.

Isaac: I am interested to know who you are listening to at the moment. What bands and artists should we have our ears on right now who you think deserve the spotlight?

Heather Stanley: The Newsboys have always been a great band but they are currently experimenting with a new sound and it’s definitely worth checking out! Capital Kings and Royal Taylor are two bands making their way in the Dance/Pop scene. I also think Christian Rap is a much underrated genre. Some great Christian Rap artists include, The Flame, NF, Lacrae and Beacon Light.

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Heather Stanley
Photo Courtesy of Michael Miller with Cowlick Creation

Isaac: Since you write your own music; where do you draw inspiration from when you write songs and what’s your favorite part about the process?

Heather Stanley: I definitely write from my own experiences. I have been through a wide variety of things since I’ve been traveling on my own for the past 10 years so there is always some new idea I can use to express how I feel about a situation and my goal is always to write in a way where people can relate. My favorite part of the process is when I’m nearing the end of recording and everything is coming together musically even better than it was in my head when I first started writing.

Isaac: If you could go open up for any artist on tour right now who would it be?

Heather Stanley: Katy Perry or Beyoncé.

Isaac: So, what’s your favorite thing to do when you aren’t writing/producing/playing etc?

Heather Stanley: I recently got into crochet. I know that sounds nerdy lol but I like being able to see things come together and put little decorations up in my apartment.

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Heather Stanley
Album Cover Photo Courtesy of Michael Miller with Cowlick Creation

Isaac: Now for our non-music question: Name five things you can’t live without?

Heather Stanley: Family, the Bible, music, chocolate and wine.

Isaac: What is the most trouble you’ve ever gotten into when you are performing or on the road that you can let us in on?

Heather Stanley: I’m a “Good Girl” like my song says!! But there was ONE time when I forgot the words to my own song! Of course that was the day we were taping a live show for a DVD…..

Isaac: Knowing what you know now, would you do it again?

Heather Stanley: In a heartbeat.

Isaac: If you were not performing, what do you think you would be doing professionally and why?

Heather Stanley: Honestly I can’t imagine doing anything else. I’ve tried the 9-5 life but it’s not for me.

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Heather Stanley
Photo Courtesy of Michael Miller with Cowlick Creation

Isaac: What’s your motto or the advice you live by?

Heather Stanley: Never let fear get in the way of your dreams. So many people let the fear of the unknown stop them from truly following what they are called to do and they end up unhappy or empty. I just recently read a book by Joyce Meyer called “Do It Afraid” challenging us all to walk through the fear and do what we are meant to do with our lives in spite of those little voices telling us that we can’t.

Isaac: Ten years from now you will be….

Heather Stanley: Living my dream out on the road bringing music and hope to people everywhere.

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Heather Stanley
Photo Courtesy of Michael Miller with Cowlick Creation

Isaac: As a great send off, tell us about one of your greatest moments as a performer.

Heather Stanley: My greatest moments are when I get done performing and people tell me they are touched by my lyrics. That always makes the struggle completely worth it.

Official Facebook Music Page:
https://www.facebook.com/heatherstanleymusic

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http://www.reverbnation.com/heatherstanley

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